London (change)
Today 19°C / 16°C
Tomorrow 17°C / 12°C

obelixx


Latest posts by obelixx

Idea's Please

Posted: 18/08/2015 at 11:06

House leeks for me too and yes, square up the pot.

I love that fish GM.

Confessions of the plantaholics

Posted: 18/08/2015 at 11:03

OH now knows a bargain when I come home with one.

For years, his idea of weeding has been to blitz my borders of everything rather than discriminate between treasures and weeds which is obviously far too complicated and time consuming.   I had the most expensive compost heaps in Belgium.  The cure has been a) get a gardener for 5 hours every fortnight to help me weed without him b) make him take me to the plant fairs and pay for the new treasures.

He now loves it when I come home with a garden centre or market bargain and even more when I sow and grow or swap with friends.

salix-tree

Posted: 17/08/2015 at 22:28

Salix are willows and willows need water so I suggest you move it somewhere damper in autumn and plant something better suited to chalky soil which can be dry and poor in nutrients.

Julie - yes the bedding plants make a difference as they compete for nutrients and moisture in what is already a limited supply in the pot.  Composts only have enough nutrients for 100 days maw so you need to feed the salix every spring with slow release pellets or granules and add a nitrogen feed to the watering liquid later on to promote the foliage.   Keeping the compost moist is essential for willows.

St.James's Park - Plant ID

Posted: 17/08/2015 at 16:12

I don't think they like clay soil - too heavy and rich.  They're better off in sandy or chalky soil with good drainage.   There was and RHS trial at Wisley where they di very poorly because of a wet summer and rich, heavy soil.

You could work in plenty of leaf mould and grit to a patch of your garden and feed with tomato or rose food but not nitrogen rich feeds as you want flowers, not foliage.

St.James's Park - Plant ID

Posted: 17/08/2015 at 14:02

It's a tender Mexican annual and the seeds are quite easy to find.  Sow under cover, bring on the plants and then put them out after the last frosts in May.   The flowers can last well into October so a good one for late interest.

Clematis

Posted: 17/08/2015 at 11:00

Keep well watered and give it some liquid tomato food too.  Clematis are hungry, thirsty plants and can take a year or two to get their roots established.  One that's just been moved will need extra care.

A challenge of a lawn

Posted: 16/08/2015 at 18:41

I too have a garden that backs on to fields and get all sorts of weeds coming through.   I don't mind clover and speedwell as they are pretty and green but big leaved stuff like plantains and dandelions are a bit obvious.

You could use glyphosate as a spot weed killer on big stuff like dandelions but otherwise wait till autumn and apply the appropriate weed and feed mixture, following instructions on the pack.

You can also aerate the lawn by going over it with a large garden fork, piercing the lawn to a depth of several inches and wiggling it about to enlarge the holes.  Then you scatter lawn sand and brush it in.  This will improve the health of the grass roots and let them grow stronger. 

Lastly, raise the level of the blades.   Healthy grass needs enough leaf to feed strong roots and fight off weeds and that lawn looks scalped.

Garden Pictures 2015

Posted: 16/08/2015 at 16:27

Lovely pics Wonky.   Only one of my dahlias has flowered so far but I hope yesterday's deluge will have broken teh drought enough t get them going.

Berghill - your garden is looking great.  I love all the nooks and crannies and changes of style round each corner.  Am I right in thinking you kept the pesky tabby kitten after all?  Has she calmed down?

To edge or not to edge ...?

Posted: 16/08/2015 at 10:55

I agree with Nut too.  Keep the grass formal or lose it all together and go for deep planting with lots of shape and form and texture.

If you do want more colour, there's a lot of bare wall that could be covered with more baskets, troughs and pots.  Depends on how much time you have for watering and dead heading and general tending.  If you can make a decent planting hole, you could also think about planting a climbing rose to cover the walls.

Whichever you do, Dove's suggestion of big pots in the corners is worth considering.

Climbing Roses Advice

Posted: 16/08/2015 at 10:48

Your Lady Hillingdon is a vigorous rose and will recover.

Do as Dave advises and take the opportunity to provide it with support - horizontal wires stretched between vine eyes screwed to a wall or fence or else trellis panels.   My preference based on experience in my garden is for wires - easy to install, discreet and needing no further maintenance if done well whereas trellis panels weather, break, need repairs or replacement.

Discussions started by obelixx

Lawn care after moles

Replies: 4    Views: 149
Last Post: 05/08/2015 at 23:00

Plant id for Obxx

Who knows what this is please? 
Replies: 5    Views: 254
Last Post: 01/07/2015 at 16:53

GW 2015

Programme content discussion 
Replies: 46    Views: 1712
Last Post: 16/03/2015 at 18:44

Chelsea photos

Replies: 36    Views: 1762
Last Post: 02/06/2014 at 09:30

Hello Jro - and any other old friends

Catch up chat 
Replies: 3    Views: 826
Last Post: 27/05/2013 at 09:18

Mare's tail

Replies: 3    Views: 1209
Last Post: 01/08/2013 at 17:01

Encouraging bats in our gardens

Replies: 23    Views: 1573
Last Post: 26/04/2013 at 21:35

Beechgrove this weekend

Replies: 6    Views: 835
Last Post: 12/04/2013 at 11:05

Weekend 22 March

Chat about plans for the weekend 
Replies: 108    Views: 4337
Last Post: 24/03/2013 at 18:19

Good Morning - 21 March

Replies: 33    Views: 2011
Last Post: 22/03/2013 at 09:57

Choosing chillies

Replies: 3    Views: 1167
Last Post: 23/02/2013 at 18:47

Hanging baskets and window boxes

Replies: 32    Views: 2984
Last Post: 03/03/2013 at 18:12

New shed - any tips?

Replies: 24    Views: 14117
Last Post: 22/02/2015 at 15:50
13 threads returned