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obelixx


Latest posts by obelixx

I will/I won't grow that again

Posted: 30/09/2013 at 08:15

Hungarian black chillies have done really well and are tasty without anaestetising teh palette so will grow again.  However Habanero Tobago seasoning failed to germinate and produced just one plant that died early despite being sown and potted on in the same conditions.

Tumbler toms produced OK but were bland.  Russian Blacks were good.

No success with home sown beets but good results with plugs.   Ditto fennel.  Home sown broccoli and purple sprouting all good and the red cabbages and radicchio plugs have done well too.   Didn't get around to sowing courgettes or pumpkins cos of the new feet and haven't really missed them but I'll grow some next year in a newly cleared bed.

Wildlife Habitat

Posted: 29/09/2013 at 11:54
http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/31776.jpg?width=350

 

i've made mine high rise from 6 pallets.  The middle is stuffed with straw and then the fronts have hollow stems, bricks with holes or pine cones.  I used strips of wood t make a shallow bed on the top layer, lined it with weed fabric and filled with compost then planted with assorted sedums and mulched with a mix of gravel and shells.  The shells hold rain water so are good for insects to drink from.

The picture shows it when first made 2 years ago.  Since then the sedums have spread.    I've had to replace the chipped bark and pine cone layers because visitors and birds have strewn them about but it's become a haven for hedgehogs, amphibians from the pond just below it and insects.

The frames on the side are from a dismantled wooden obelisk and will support the campsis if it ever gets big enough.  Keeps being knocked back by hard winters.

Gardeners world

Posted: 28/09/2013 at 17:14

I enjoyed Friday's GW though I don't think Monty is very good at set pieces with RHS gardeners.  However, it was good to see open gardens with vistas and mixed plantings.

I didn't like the overall view of the Piet Oudolph garden  - too dull and monotone - but some of the close ups of the beds and the perennials used were luscious.  I prefer grasses with perennials rather than the other way round.   I love miscanthus  and also grow carex, molinia and hakonechloa which do very well here.  Stipas and penisetums and so on are too nesh for my garden..

Talkback: How to look after roses in autumn

Posted: 28/09/2013 at 13:50

Glad to be of help.  Do you know what variety it is?  Roses that are good for northern apsects are not that common.

Talkback: How to look after roses in autumn

Posted: 28/09/2013 at 11:46

There is indeed a difference.   Have look at this from the RHS - http://apps.rhs.org.uk/advicesearch/profile.aspx?pid=189 

It also covers other kinds of roses and their pruning regime.

Current problems with forum and login

Posted: 27/09/2013 at 17:21

Hello Daniel.  Just logged back in 5 minutes ago - 17:15 - and still having to do ctrl F5 to get latest posts in threads.

Do appreciate being kept informed of what's going on.  Good luck to the team hunting and fixing the bugs.

Push pull hoe

Posted: 27/09/2013 at 14:05

I have the Wolf system and have two of the 15cm wide push me pull you heads and recently found the 10cm one in teh UK as it's not sold in Belgium.  Very useful for cleaning between roaws of veggies and salads and the smaller head is good in the borders while new plants are getting established.

I also have handles in various lengths so can use the heads standing or kneeling depending on where i'm working.

 

Tomato varieties

Posted: 27/09/2013 at 14:01

On Beechgrove recently, Sungold won the taste test.  It has an AGM form the RHS so worth investigating.

I have grown Black Russian this year and been very pleased.   It's fleshy like a beef tomato but a medium size and very tasty.

Talkback: How to look after roses in autumn

Posted: 27/09/2013 at 13:55

Apart from shortening long stems to prevent wind rock in autumn and winter gales, mine get done in March or early April depending on what kind of winter we've had.  That means I can prune off any wood killed by hard frosts and see where the new shoots are coming from and prune back to those to keep the shrubs open and airy which helps prevent disease such as mildew later on in the season.

spring bulbs

Posted: 27/09/2013 at 13:49

The short answer is no, they won't keep if they're not planted so, if neither of the above solutions suits you, pass them on to a friend or neighbour who'd appreciate them.

Discussions started by obelixx

Chelsea photos

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Last Post: 02/06/2014 at 09:30

Hello Jro - and any other old friends

Catch up chat 
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Mare's tail

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Last Post: 01/08/2013 at 17:01

Encouraging bats in our gardens

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Last Post: 26/04/2013 at 21:35

Beechgrove this weekend

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Last Post: 12/04/2013 at 11:05

Weekend 22 March

Chat about plans for the weekend 
Replies: 108    Views: 3324
Last Post: 24/03/2013 at 18:19

Good Morning - 21 March

Replies: 33    Views: 1609
Last Post: 22/03/2013 at 09:57

Choosing chillies

Replies: 3    Views: 887
Last Post: 23/02/2013 at 18:47

Hanging baskets and window boxes

Replies: 32    Views: 2247
Last Post: 03/03/2013 at 18:12

New shed - any tips?

Replies: 18    Views: 7134
Last Post: 12/01/2013 at 08:55
10 threads returned