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obelixx


Latest posts by obelixx

Hydrangea won't flower

Posted: 06/10/2013 at 12:09

Sorry about the double reply but I couldn't edit the first one after I realised you had it in a pot so the answer had to be different.

Clematis

Posted: 06/10/2013 at 11:59

Happens to me too Sarah.  It can take a couple of years for a clematis to settle in and perform and I have several I call Lazarus as they have come back from the dead, sometimes after a 2 year gap and by then I've lost the label and have no idea what they are any more.   Always a nice surprise though.

Hydrangea won't flower

Posted: 06/10/2013 at 11:55

You could try giving it a liqid feed of rose or tomato food as these are high potash and will encourage flowers.  Mophead hydrangeas flower on the previous season's growth so this may help with flower formation for next year. 

Other than that, mophead hydrangeas need moisture so never let its compost dry out and give it a mulch of good garden compost and/or well rotted manure to help retain moisture and provide extra nutrients.   You may need to remove the top couple of incjes of compost to accommodate it.   Do this now, after a good watering and again next spring and every spring thereafter.

You may be better trying the paniculata forms as they flower on new season's wood and need less moisture but still plenty of nutrients.

Hydrangea won't flower

Posted: 06/10/2013 at 11:52

You could try giving it a liqid feed of rose or tomato food as these are high potash and will encourage flowers.  Mophead hydrangeas flower on the previous season's growth so this may help with flower formation for next year. 

Other than that; mophead hudrangeas need moisture so give it plenty of mulch of good garden compost and/or well rotted manure to help retain moisture and provide extra nutrients because sandy soil is fast draining and usually low in nutrients.   Do this now, after a good rain fall when the soil is moist and again in mid winter when the ground is not frozen and next spring and every autumn thereafter.

You may be better trying the paniculata forms as they flower on new season's wood and need less moisture but still plenty of nutrients.

to prune or not to prune?

Posted: 06/10/2013 at 11:46

It depends on the weedkiller.  If it's systemic you need to wash it off or prune it off immediately after spraying to prevent it getting to the roots and killing the whole plant.

Either way, I would take photos of all the dead or damaged plants and then prune out the dead wood and maybe erect a fleece or net wind break around the ceanothus to protect it from biting winter winds.   Give it some bonemeal lightly forked around its base to help encourage roots over the winter.

Get in touch with your local council's community welfare officer about the problem with your neighbours to see if they can mediate or issue warnings and, maybe the police too.  Wilfully damaging other people's property is a criminal offence.

Does anyone know of a propagation year planner pls?

Posted: 03/10/2013 at 15:48

Not exactly but I have an RHS book called the Complete Book of Plant propagation which shows how and give lists of when but organised by plant type rather than month.

You could also check out this link - http://www.thegardenersalmanac.co.uk/Indexes/index.htm - which lists what to do in the garden each month and has and alphabetical index which includes propagation, again in groups of plants rather than by month.

You could always draw up your own planner with this information.

 

Wee Jean fae Aiberdeen

Posted: 02/10/2013 at 22:00

I too have hard winters but seed survive so I get surprise verbenas popping up.  Haven't had to relocate or dig up any yet as they are, effectively, transparent so look well almost anywhere.   This year I shall watch for the seeds being ripe and then shake the seed heads where I think I could do with more.

Cobaea

Posted: 02/10/2013 at 09:20

It's a native of Mexico where it is perennial.  However, in Britain, it's grown as an annual because it can't cope with temps below +5C.

You could try taking cuttings to keep indoors but given the speed of growth I'd stick with sowing it fresh every year in late Jan/early Feb and then, by the time the frosts are over in mid May, you should have a good sized plant to put out in the garden and give an impressive display all summer.

Decking lighting spacing

Posted: 01/10/2013 at 21:32

Surely it depends on how brightly you want it to be lit.

Front garden

Posted: 01/10/2013 at 08:25

A lot depends on how exposed your site is and how cold you get in winter.  I can'tgrow pittosporums or phormiums and escallonias barely keep their leaves through my winters.  In Cornwall they are reliably and healthily evergreen.  Given the long spells of cold, my hollies have taken 11 years to grow to just over 3' high so maybe a bit slow.

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