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obelixx


Latest posts by obelixx

Talkback: Late-flowering clematis

Posted: 07/10/2013 at 15:20

There are hundreds of late flowering clematis to choose form.  Have a look at this site and enter September in the flowering period then click on Search and you'll get a long list http://www.clematis.hull.ac.uk/new-clemlistsearch.cfm    You can also do a search on colour or height or aspect.

The info available includes the pruning group, flower description, height of growth, flower colour etc.  Another part of the site explains pruning.

All clematis are hungry, thirsty plants.  They need a good soil with plenty of well rotted manure and/or garden compost to enrich it and you can give them a handful or two of specialist clematis food every spring.  They should bever be allowed t oget thirsty, especially in pots.   I give occasional liquid feeds of rose or tomato food between spring and flowering and I dead head Group 2s to encourage a second flush of flowers later in the season.

Having said that, a few of mine have perfomred poorly this year whilst others have been spectacular.  I put it down to stress from a long cold spring and then a hot dry summer so am nurturing them along and hoping for better things next year.

 

What's happening in my garden!

Posted: 07/10/2013 at 14:58

As all your plants are in pots they are entirely dependent on your for food and water.  In summer, most pots need watering every day to keep the compost from drying out and stressing the plants.

Stressed plants succumb to disease and pests.   Happy, well fed and watered plants fight them off.  Water them well now, soaking them in a bucket if you can until no more bubbles appear, and then keep them watered till they go dormant.  Stand them on pot feet or bricks for the winter so they don't sit in a puddle.

The white stuff is mildew and, as stated above happens to stressed plants.   Mint likes moisture and shade form midday sun.   Dicentra does tend to die back earlier than many plants.   Honeysuckle and buddleia can be cut back next spring as new growth starts and then will need a good feed of slow release food to last them for a few months plus regular weekly liquid feeds of rose or tomato feed to keep them growing and flowering well.

Bin or burn any affected foliage you remove.  Do not compost it.

Can anyone identify this plant?

Posted: 07/10/2013 at 14:48

I agree but height does vary according to situation.  After moving mine to more direct sun and less fertile soil they are now about 4' tall.  Before that they were 6'.

Clematis Polish Spirit

Posted: 07/10/2013 at 13:21

It should be fine and you need somethng with a bit of oomph to get to the top of your lilac tree so you can see the flowers.  Just make sure it's not planted too close to the tree as it won't want to compete for nutrients and water.  Give it a good deep hole and plenty of good compost and well rotted manure and plant it a few inches deeper than it was in its pot as this encourages extra shoots.

If it's very small, I would pot it up and look after it with plenty of feed and TLC for another year before planting it out.

 

Hydrangea won't flower

Posted: 06/10/2013 at 12:09

Sorry about the double reply but I couldn't edit the first one after I realised you had it in a pot so the answer had to be different.

Clematis

Posted: 06/10/2013 at 11:59

Happens to me too Sarah.  It can take a couple of years for a clematis to settle in and perform and I have several I call Lazarus as they have come back from the dead, sometimes after a 2 year gap and by then I've lost the label and have no idea what they are any more.   Always a nice surprise though.

Hydrangea won't flower

Posted: 06/10/2013 at 11:55

You could try giving it a liqid feed of rose or tomato food as these are high potash and will encourage flowers.  Mophead hydrangeas flower on the previous season's growth so this may help with flower formation for next year. 

Other than that, mophead hydrangeas need moisture so never let its compost dry out and give it a mulch of good garden compost and/or well rotted manure to help retain moisture and provide extra nutrients.   You may need to remove the top couple of incjes of compost to accommodate it.   Do this now, after a good watering and again next spring and every spring thereafter.

You may be better trying the paniculata forms as they flower on new season's wood and need less moisture but still plenty of nutrients.

Hydrangea won't flower

Posted: 06/10/2013 at 11:52

You could try giving it a liqid feed of rose or tomato food as these are high potash and will encourage flowers.  Mophead hydrangeas flower on the previous season's growth so this may help with flower formation for next year. 

Other than that; mophead hudrangeas need moisture so give it plenty of mulch of good garden compost and/or well rotted manure to help retain moisture and provide extra nutrients because sandy soil is fast draining and usually low in nutrients.   Do this now, after a good rain fall when the soil is moist and again in mid winter when the ground is not frozen and next spring and every autumn thereafter.

You may be better trying the paniculata forms as they flower on new season's wood and need less moisture but still plenty of nutrients.

to prune or not to prune?

Posted: 06/10/2013 at 11:46

It depends on the weedkiller.  If it's systemic you need to wash it off or prune it off immediately after spraying to prevent it getting to the roots and killing the whole plant.

Either way, I would take photos of all the dead or damaged plants and then prune out the dead wood and maybe erect a fleece or net wind break around the ceanothus to protect it from biting winter winds.   Give it some bonemeal lightly forked around its base to help encourage roots over the winter.

Get in touch with your local council's community welfare officer about the problem with your neighbours to see if they can mediate or issue warnings and, maybe the police too.  Wilfully damaging other people's property is a criminal offence.

Does anyone know of a propagation year planner pls?

Posted: 03/10/2013 at 15:48

Not exactly but I have an RHS book called the Complete Book of Plant propagation which shows how and give lists of when but organised by plant type rather than month.

You could also check out this link - http://www.thegardenersalmanac.co.uk/Indexes/index.htm - which lists what to do in the garden each month and has and alphabetical index which includes propagation, again in groups of plants rather than by month.

You could always draw up your own planner with this information.

 

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