Palaisglide


Latest posts by Palaisglide

What's the weather like in your area?

Posted: 16/09/2012 at 22:18

Hello Posh, one lot landed in America yesterday that is why I have Alfy, t'other lot landed in Canada Friday and Pam is in Cyprus for another week yet so I consider myself on my holidays. No rushing around, please myself and relax.
I did a small piece of ham with a honey and brown sugar glaze and the usual veg and Yorkshires but later and a lot less of it.
Had a nice lattice apple pie a couple of hours ago then watched Gently, the one man and his dog were taken off because of golf.
The weather turned nasty though the box still says cloudy I do not know why they bother.
I was locked out on this board earlier and had to sign in again twice, as I never log out I ask why. It is every Sunday I have trouble either locked out or having to sign in each time I want to post.
Love tulips although some are getting old now and I need to renew those and some Daf's

Frank

manure

Posted: 16/09/2012 at 16:37

As long as the manure is well rotted crumbly and sweet smelling then spread it on the beds and lightly cover it.
Save some and put it in the bottom of the potato trenches in spring to give them a good start.
Sweet peas like some good manure under them when planted out but some Peas and Beans make their own Nitrogen so do not need manure. Cabbages will need some lime rather than manure so depends on what you intend to plant.
You could cover it and wait until spring then spread it where needed.

Frank.

tree stump

Posted: 16/09/2012 at 16:28

Marigold, the answer is unless you have or can get hold of a stump grinder it will have to stay. The other way of digging it out would need a team of men and having had to pull them out with a bulldozer and a winch even the men would struggle so no easy way.
I drilled into the stumps of two trees I cut down and filled them with a mixture of sump oil and acid then covered the stump with heavy plastic, one has rotted down after five years the other is beginning to crumble.
A gardening company would get rid of it at some cost, as to planting where it had been it is best to let it rest with a good mulch on the scar for a year or more.

Frank.

Fork Handles

Posted: 16/09/2012 at 15:50
Penninepetal wrote (see)
Frank, lots of sheep farmers around here, a very well known family locally specialising in female sheepdog handlers, Katy Cropper was a champion. Whenever there is an event on locally though, it always seems to rain.
Glyn

Part of the fun Glyn sitting on a wet straw bale dressed in your oils, a soaking wet dog drying himself between you legs. I think someone slipped some right bolshy Southern sheep in though, a couple never even got to the pen after the split.
"t'other alf" tonight they might even show rounding up hens with geese another local pastime.

Frank.

Fork Handles

Posted: 16/09/2012 at 10:52

Penninepetal, last night for me was One Man and his Dog, SCD then Montalbano followed by the Clintons, quite an insight that one.
There was one lady who got my attention, a real beauty with fine hocks lovely wool and fiesty, she faced the sheep dog down and stamped her foot saying "back off pal" the one on Montalbano was not too bad either.

Frank.

What's the weather like in your area?

Posted: 16/09/2012 at 10:44

Given up on forced Hyacinths just put stacks of bulbs in and find they usually cover quite a period of time in bloom, some in pots to bring in the house, I love the scent.

The box says cloudy for Stockton and it is, rolling cloud of many colours although the sun is finding its way through. Alfy was laid on my feet but found a patch of sunlight  much better and moved.
It is the Great North Run on at the moment and they could get rain later, it is usually fair for them, the wind will be behind them as they run up that hill to South Shields and the finish.

Frank.

Wartime Farm

Posted: 16/09/2012 at 10:35

Watched One Man and his Dog last night, the other half is on tonight, it used to run over several weeks but I suppose it is a niche sport. The sheep were a right bolshy lot one ewe faced down the dog and stamped her foot, the body language was "watch it mate" and they could not get them to flow, we will see what happens tonight then.
Ma, for some reason it brought back memories of the Creamery at the Farm, Aunt Mabel made all her own cream and butter and the vision of that cool room half tiled with the long bench of flat bowls of cream with muslin cages over them was quite vivid for some reason. It reminded me of the buttermilk that went into the cooking when all the women filled the kitchen with bread scones and cakes during Harvest and other get togethers, I preferred the milk straight from the churn full fat and creamy, oh and warm.
Funny such bright memories yet? yet, "err" what day is it?

Frank.

What's the weather like in your area?

Posted: 15/09/2012 at 11:51

Stockton sunny and clear says the box having just arrived back home I know that for once the box got it right. Blue sky on all sides though cooler and also noticed the leaves changing colour, an early Autumn??

Frank.

Wartime Farm

Posted: 14/09/2012 at 18:03

Hello Ma, wondered where you were.
We have to make allowances as they try to generalise what was quite a varied often totally different trade as you moved from County to County. We moved from Hill farming sheep to Dairy farming on land that a couple of feet down would have produced brick clay to a General farm, each was a different technique and set up.
The we being my Mothers very close Aunt and Uncle, I spent a lot of time on those farms learning the hard way.
Our own smallholding could have been called a small farm and we all had to work at our own jobs from being able to hold a fork and muck out, you are right about that the handling compared with the land girls slinging hay onto the waggon was a bit diabolical.
In this part of the country you could get oat cakes and some went into Linseed oil cattle cake, some would go to the malting's.
We should allow for some things differing and cannot expect them to handle the tools they did not grow up with, tea tonight was a hot pot, Ruth must have put her fluence on me last night, it was slow cooked and delicious, the sliced potato on top well coated with butter done to a turn, what are we having next week Ruth?

Frank.

Fork Handles

Posted: 14/09/2012 at 17:40

Making a mountain out of molehills, not interested is my reaction although people should be allowed to do what they wish on private land.
A lady lived behind me, her garden backing on to mine would strip all off and sunbathe, I put up a taller fence.


Years back making a buggy from old pram parts for the Grandchildren it proved a real winner. They had posh bikes but that old buggy was in use for a long time, the wooden barrow I made for them is still being played with by the latest batch of grand children. You do not need spend the earth.

Frank.

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