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Palaisglide


Latest posts by Palaisglide

Wartime Farm

Posted: 16/09/2012 at 10:35

Watched One Man and his Dog last night, the other half is on tonight, it used to run over several weeks but I suppose it is a niche sport. The sheep were a right bolshy lot one ewe faced down the dog and stamped her foot, the body language was "watch it mate" and they could not get them to flow, we will see what happens tonight then.
Ma, for some reason it brought back memories of the Creamery at the Farm, Aunt Mabel made all her own cream and butter and the vision of that cool room half tiled with the long bench of flat bowls of cream with muslin cages over them was quite vivid for some reason. It reminded me of the buttermilk that went into the cooking when all the women filled the kitchen with bread scones and cakes during Harvest and other get togethers, I preferred the milk straight from the churn full fat and creamy, oh and warm.
Funny such bright memories yet? yet, "err" what day is it?

Frank.

What's the weather like in your area?

Posted: 15/09/2012 at 11:51

Stockton sunny and clear says the box having just arrived back home I know that for once the box got it right. Blue sky on all sides though cooler and also noticed the leaves changing colour, an early Autumn??

Frank.

Wartime Farm

Posted: 14/09/2012 at 18:03

Hello Ma, wondered where you were.
We have to make allowances as they try to generalise what was quite a varied often totally different trade as you moved from County to County. We moved from Hill farming sheep to Dairy farming on land that a couple of feet down would have produced brick clay to a General farm, each was a different technique and set up.
The we being my Mothers very close Aunt and Uncle, I spent a lot of time on those farms learning the hard way.
Our own smallholding could have been called a small farm and we all had to work at our own jobs from being able to hold a fork and muck out, you are right about that the handling compared with the land girls slinging hay onto the waggon was a bit diabolical.
In this part of the country you could get oat cakes and some went into Linseed oil cattle cake, some would go to the malting's.
We should allow for some things differing and cannot expect them to handle the tools they did not grow up with, tea tonight was a hot pot, Ruth must have put her fluence on me last night, it was slow cooked and delicious, the sliced potato on top well coated with butter done to a turn, what are we having next week Ruth?

Frank.

Fork Handles

Posted: 14/09/2012 at 17:40

Making a mountain out of molehills, not interested is my reaction although people should be allowed to do what they wish on private land.
A lady lived behind me, her garden backing on to mine would strip all off and sunbathe, I put up a taller fence.


Years back making a buggy from old pram parts for the Grandchildren it proved a real winner. They had posh bikes but that old buggy was in use for a long time, the wooden barrow I made for them is still being played with by the latest batch of grand children. You do not need spend the earth.

Frank.

FIG

Posted: 14/09/2012 at 11:52

Fig's are normally trouble free, they can develop problems though if the roots do not get moisture, irregular watering for pots is not the way to go.
They do best in the ground although like mint the roots need restricting so set in a brick box or in a large bottomless pot they then get the residual moisture at the base.
As most disease is fungal, Coral spot or Grey mould, I am not sure what you describe but try washing down with a light mix or warm water and washing up liquid see if it clears.
Sorry i can not be more specific.

Frank.

Fork Handles

Posted: 14/09/2012 at 11:18

Jean, we were outdoor kids everything was outside, the house was for eating and sleeping in. Even in winter we had to be dragged in from the sledging soaking wet but glowing, we had water meadows near by which flooded to about three inches then froze, the perfect ice rink. I as did most had iron skates we strapped onto our boots as we did with roller skates. there would be crowds in the evening the adults came down to skate, some fires would be lit in braziers and if we were lucky some chestnuts roasted.
No TV or electronic whizz bangs so on winter nights we played board games or cards under Gas light, we had electric but the gas light was warmer, more cosy and ours was a three mantle posh one, the big iron range glowing, melting cheese onto our bread for supper with a glass of milky drink, we slept the sleep of the satisfied.
A world our grandchildren would think of as the dark ages, my own children are beginning to ask me now what it was like and really do not comprehend. I have written a lot of it down and filed it for them to find when I leave this place, such massive changes in what seems like such a short period of time.

Frank
PS I for got to mention Tom Mix.

What's the weather like in your area?

Posted: 14/09/2012 at 10:12

Rain I was beginning to worry you have not posted for a while, not been a good year for the garden but we can plan for next year now.

Blue sky all round, sun lighting up the house and the box saying Stockton Cloudy "err where" it is very windy so not as warm as it looks, still it blows the stale air out of the house and the east side is warm out of the westerly winds. I am off to see what new bulbs are in the GC
Alfy will be back for a month today, his lot are off to see my Daughter in California among other things.

Frank.

Fork Handles

Posted: 14/09/2012 at 10:05

Jean, the twopenny rush where all the kids got two hours of fun for a few pence. The usherettes with chairs and whips kept all us screaming lot imprisoned in front of the screen as Gene Autry correct, Pearl White always ended up tied to railway lines or hanging over a cliff on a branch "see what happens next week folk" the Lone Ranger and Tonto, the singing cowboy Roy Rodgers a couple of funnies the news it was great.
It kept all us kids in one place whilst mothers went and did the Saturday shop in the Market. I guess H&S would have something to say these days.

Frank.

Wartime Farm

Posted: 14/09/2012 at 09:45
Jellyjam wrote (see)

Frank, it is really interesting to read your posts alongside the programmes. I have always watched these recreation projects with the thought that they can only present a partial view  of what it was actually like to Iive through the times.I hope you will continue to post as the series progresses  

 

Jellyjam We found that out with the other programmes Edwardian and Victorian Farm, they can only represent facets. At least this time they are not making blatant mistakes it is far better researched.
There were reams of paper dished out to any one producing food of any sort which in a country area would be most, rules are meant to be broken or in Dad's case slightly dented, when Mother late for her war-work took the Austen chummy car after making me start it (a bit like the one on the show only a two seater) she who had no licence and as far as I knew no lessons got herself in trouble. When the local Bobby duly arrived he and Dad had a long talk up the garden they came back and Mum was told do not do that again as he left with a large packet of Bacon in his pocket. Even a dead straight bat played off the side at times.
I will comment on what I know though it would appear different parts of the country reacted in different ways to suit their needs.
Ruth's stew looked good to me with some some freshly made farm bread.

Frank.

Wartime Farm

Posted: 13/09/2012 at 23:29

Hello Posh, indeed it is fascinating to be taken back and the Army used hay boxes in the field even in modern times.  There was no need for the Paraffin cooker as the farmhouse kitchen range never went out and the side oven would be used for long cook one pot meals.
Silage was not something done around us as we had plenty of hay and the whole village turned out to help to bring it in and stack it, the top would then be thatched..We never lost the sheep or pigs, picking the apple crop could be hazardous when the sheep and pigs were let in the orchard for the windfalls.
Dad kept a couple of pigs for the pig club among our own, they did bring waste for me to boil in the pig boiler along with potato's root veg and anything else we had spare from the fields. Having the truck he also picked up the waste jam and curd from the jam factory and waste cake and bread from the local bakery, add to that an allowance of corn meal plus more from the farm and those pigs lived on the best. He would not have fish-meal which many used nor would he use bone or meat products. Part of my job was to sort what people brought and what we did not want went into a bin and off to the National waste recovery at Darlington, other pig owner got it after it had been boiled down into a sort of block.
WI could get the sugar for bottling and jam making from hedge row fruits which we all picked in season although all the women who were not working in the village would join in, never saw one of those canners but now realise why everything came in seven pound cans in the army, that must have been the regular can size for the machine.
Of course trading went on all the time we all did it you just did not talk to strangers about it, my Father could get all the petrol he needed having an "A" licence for the truck and he was asked and they got a very short answer usually ending in off. He was a dead straight bat that did not always go for his son.

Frank

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