Palaisglide


Latest posts by Palaisglide

Potting on seedlings

Posted: 04/03/2016 at 15:20

Pot on singly into a multi tray, one of those with a dozen small sections or pots, the compost needs to be one third compost one third washed sand and one third small grit or vermiculite for drainage. They do not need rich compost until the next pot on or going into the ground. The next pot on will need half compost and the other half a mix of sand and grit, mine at that point go into three inch pots until after the last frost. Treat them like baby's start on milk, wean to solids, then plant out, they thrive in ordinary loam after that.

Frank

Jobs in your garden

Posted: 03/03/2016 at 13:21

Verdun, the rats and even the mice up here much prefer a good Cumberland roll of sausage, they even knock on the door and ask for a jug of onion gravy to go with it, you are safe? Not only pensioners with sticks, I have been rammed with shopping trolley's pushed by young women who never seem to have one free second in thier diaries. Three times since Christmas and that is only the ones that hurt, last time I turned and saw a woman with drawn face a thousand yard look in her eye's a bawling youngster in the trolly and obviously elsewhere, she did not even say sorry just scurried away. Why has life for them got so miserable I ask?

Frank

Jobs in your garden

Posted: 03/03/2016 at 12:10

Warmth, air, damp but not wet and turn every few weeks is the secret. My home built wooden boxes against a brick wall and where they get some sun will give me usable compost in three months summer six months winter, the brick wall takes in heat and gives it back in cooler periods. The boxes are an inch off the ground with wire mesh to stop rodents. Start with twiggy branches to keep the air gap then build up in thin layers, spray each layer as you go, damp not wet, add either a handful of granular fertiliser now and then or gentlemans water after a good night out, I keep an old milk bottle in the garage topping up as the need takes me. My boxes have lids lift them and give the top a good toss with a fork. It all gets tossed into a wheel barrow shuffled around and tossed back to get plenty of air mixed in, the bacteria need air as much as we do, damp as you go cover and leave to do its magic. Good compost will be dark crumbly and smell sweet, there may be the odd twig it matters not, if you want it for potting sift it.

Frank

To Grit or not to Grit- that is the question

Posted: 02/03/2016 at 13:56

If using plant saucers then do not add drainage to the pot, the soil at the base of the pot acts like a wick and will take up the moisture in the saucer. Adding grit to the soil in the pots allows free drainage through the soil from the top plus some air, the roots of any plants in pots will find the moisture often appearing in the saucer if left. My way is add drainage if the pots stand directly on soil do not add if pot is on a saucer. This all depends on the plant, is it a water lover or does it like well drained soil. That is the art of gardening, giving plants the conditions they need.

Frank

Personal Profiles.

Posted: 02/03/2016 at 12:26

Topbird, always enjoyed everything I did otherwise why do it? At my age make life fun or vegitate. The Lady over the back would embarass me sunbathing in the nude!!! Not a pretty sight, building a trellis on the fence and covering it with climbers helped though finding something to do out front helped. She moved and we got a lovely Lady gardener and we spent time talking over the fence until Joan came and belted me with a pan? Oh well gardening is still fun.

Frank

Personal Profiles.

Posted: 02/03/2016 at 10:21

"Nerdy geeks"? What kind of plant is that? Through time we do learn to nurture the soil, how to bring dead plants back to life and give a long slow kiss of life to the next door gardening Lady when she faints from too much sun, not too often lately. We all do our own thing which is why I read the forum, you get this picture of a versatile bunch of nutters. If curiosity got the better of me the place to go would be Forkers you get it all there. This is a place for gardeners, good bad or like me ugly, who needs more.

Frank

Help please

Posted: 01/03/2016 at 13:05

Most seeds need an ambient temperature to germinate which is why an indoor window sill or in my case a heated sand box is needed. The sand box with thermostat is curtaind off from the rest of the greenhouse with shelves above the heater so i can lift the seed boxes as they germinate not needing as much heat although still needing some warmth. A plastic or even glass greenhouse will get very cold at night this can set the seedlings back if it does not kill them. Propagators can be inexpensive for a simple one and worth the cost in good seedlings. As an example my sweet pea seeds have just gone in the sand box, some people have sown from November on, here in the NE England it would be a waste of time, so it also depends on where you live.

Hope this helps.

Frank

Bare Root Strawberry

Posted: 01/03/2016 at 10:27

Give them a good soaking and get them in the ground. It is essential the roots fatten and spread as soon as possible. It would need to be a hard long frost to harm them so get them planted.

Frank

Personal Profiles.

Posted: 01/03/2016 at 10:19

My credentials are many many years of gardening, reading books, making mistakes, sometimes massive and learning on the job. The advice i give on this forum is my way of trying to stop others making the same mistakes, they use the information as they wish, up to them. What else is there to know I ask?

Frank

Greenhouse Layout

Posted: 16/02/2016 at 23:26

My staging has been on the north wall of the GH for thirty odd years, tomato's on the floor south side and no problems. Anything that was on the staging has gone out by the time the toms are up and fruiting. I along with many older growers stop them at 5-6 trusses and nip out the growing tips, with inside and outside tomato plants there will be plenty for the extended family and me. The sun in the NE of England certainly rises high enough to give full light on the staging even with tomato's in full leaf although I do remove leaves covering ripening trusses to let the sun at the fruits. Gardeners have their own methods, what works for some not for others, my experience is my key to how things get done.

Frank

Discussions started by Palaisglide

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Some of the plants seem to love this weather? 
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13 threads returned