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Palaisglide


Latest posts by Palaisglide

MOB rants

Posted: 28/02/2013 at 10:03
Gardening Grandma wrote (see)

You dog! Sounds as though you had a lot of fun in our young days! Funnily enough, I know a Nesta.... Only joking! Should I now stat a rant about the intentions of footloose young men?

Do you remember where in Bridgend you were stationed?

I do indeed G/Grandma smack in the middle of town, the REME had a workshop in what must have been a Garage at one time, we lived one side of the main road and worked in buildings the other side.
I was told to be careful the first day I arrived, "these Welsh girls boyo just want to get out of the valleys see like" "err right" and off I went to the weekly dance and forgot it all. We would go to Porthcawl some Saturdays there was a big dance hall there and the beach came in handy. Dancing in those days was the in thing and as I had danced from being 11 watching my parents Competition dancers I knew how, it was a big come on especially for the older girls who just loved to dance and could. Nesta, ( I met another Nesta in Rhyl) was a real Welsh dark haired bright eyed full of fun girl and I did miss her but Soldiers moved on and left many a girl behind them, they probably shrugged and on to the next.

Flo, a month or so back my oven packed up so Daughter and I went to the local supplier, hundreds of the things standing in rows. Daughter started at the £1200 end I started at the £3/7/6 end and we met with bright young lady and Daughter trying to sell me an all singing and dancing oven. Holding my hands up for silence I said "you turn it on, you cook you turn it off, I have plenty of timers so why would I need all the knobs and things" they gave in but it still cost me £480.

Frank.

MOB rants

Posted: 27/02/2013 at 23:08
Gardening Grandma wrote (see)

Just how friendly were these Welsh girls, Palaisglide?

I never tell tales out of school where the ladies are concerned, I was a dancer and in Bridgend that counted for a lot.
Dark haired fire in her eye's Nesta took me home for Sunday Lunch with the family, a roast Yorkshires the lot ( and very good Yorkshires too) sitting round the table after lunch mother suddenly looked me square in the eye and said "if you are going to marry our Nesta you will have to move here" WHAT who mentioned marriage "yikes" and Nesta sitting there saying nothing with a wicked look in her eye.
Two weeks later on the Monday the guard got me up early said pack all your gear sign out and collect your rail warrant you are moving. I was on the early train out of Wales to Hampshire, no goodbye's and no further contact and at the first camp dance met a lovely Geordy girl then met her twin sister at another camp dance later in the week, that got very interesting too.

Frank.

MOB rants

Posted: 27/02/2013 at 22:28

Chica, the forces tend to take on a mixed accent a bit of everything. i was Army a Son and Daughter RAF and another Son Army we all tend to have a sort of flat accent when we talk together which is not exactly the accent we were born with. The funny thing is I can always detect part of the original accent in a person and usually to within a few miles of their birth place, I suppose it is my musical ear "err" I mean both of them of course.
G/Grandma I was stationed in Bridgend, Rhyl, Pembroke and the Tank firing ranges on the West coast, I know the Welsh Girls are very friendly but then met the Welsh Dragon's their mothers.

Frank.

MOB rants

Posted: 27/02/2013 at 16:22

Why all this aggro with neighbours, I do not understand it, my neighbours send each other Christmas cards and never fail to stop and talk if I am working on the front, lovely people all.
Saying that we are all fully detached and seemingly all gardeners although one lady over the road gets a bespoke gardener in who makes it last a week with a couple of trucks and machinery.
I mind the lttle dog for one while she is at work three days a week, he is a lovely lad she thinks he is a Jack Russel I know he is a Corgi, still good company. Also take in the parcels for them and we chat when they call to pick them up.
I ask are we Northerner's actually more friendly or could it be the more space between neighbours the better they become, just asking.

Frank.

MOB rants

Posted: 27/02/2013 at 11:31

Trolls ladies are best ignored, do not be drawn into replying to them at all, that gets them very hot under the collar, they say bad things to get recognition so if you ignore them you won they lost.
Having been on these boards various for over thirteen years you learn the ropes and if they do annoy you there is always Alert Moderator button.
Phones I ignore them too, the family will phone me on the Mobile which is always with me, if it is important people will ring back when you are having a meal, watching the one decent programme on TV or nodded off so worry not.

Frank.

What's the weather like in your area?

Posted: 27/02/2013 at 11:13

Stockton on Tees, blue sky with some puffy white cloud, bitter cold we still have an east wind, gardening? forget it.

Frank.

MOB rants

Posted: 26/02/2013 at 16:24

Rants, sounds more like revenge, did that a few times in the army although it is not the pleasant feeling we expect.
This is a rant, Windmills erected on a lovely bit of coast well within sight of the Promenade that on the three coldest days were incapable of producing electricity because we did not have enough wind.
Green taxes because of our tiny footprint on the world when Germany are to build ten new coal fired power staions China and India using coal by the millions of tons, we are closing ours down with no back up, the rest of the world must think we have totally lost it.
Being an engineer I know the footprint of those large gear boxes filled with oil on top of the windmill towers, if they published the facts they would have mass riots on their hands, we may as well close the Country down now as it will happen sooner than we think, no chatting on laptops then, no electricity.

Frank.

Early sowing

Posted: 26/02/2013 at 16:00

Gatehill, we have a Nursery just up the road with fields of greenhouses, they produce those solid looking early plants by giving artificial light and moderating the air temperature and it shows in the price they charge.
Here in the North East we wait, sowing early does not give an early start as normal sown seeds catch up and often produce edible stuff at the same time as early seeds. Patience is the best advice to give a gardener and light is often more important than heat, unless you are growing rhubarb.

Frank.

overgrown border

Posted: 26/02/2013 at 15:49

Nightgarden, most shrubs are dormant so moving them is OK, you may need help as quite a large root ball is best and also heavy. Have a hole dug if moving the shrub then dig well away from the main root where possible if close to another shrub then you may get some damage to both but Nature cures her own. I lift mine for moving onto a large shovel and drag it to position or an old plastic bag but make sure it is strong. If leaving the shrub for a while then wrap the root ball in plastic and water well. Once moved and well watered in (give water for a few days) then it will be ready for Spring as we all are.
Creeping buttercup can be lifted using a small fork, if you ease the soil along the run it can be lifted in clumps but do not put on the compost.
We let chickens run in the garden they do little damage if given enough room, you may need to go looking for the eggs though.
Have fun Frank.

overgrown border

Posted: 26/02/2013 at 14:15

Nightgarden, your instinct is to get stuck in although my experience says wait, take your time. Let the small plants flower and either then put a marker on them or move them in flower to the place you wish them to be, with a good root ball they will be OK.
You will then have space to work on the larger project of cleaning the ground digging it over and giving feed.
You will also have room to move some of the marked plants along, clump them up into a scheme or divide and spread them. The other way is to discard some of the plants if you wish and plant new ones.
Do all this a bit at a time, clean small areas dig over and fertilise or mulch working along or even in parts of the border, as Rosa said tackle the shrubs first to give space then spend some time on your knees getting rid of the weed.
It will take time though you will have plenty to look at whilst you do it otherwise a full removal and renovation will take much time and effort, you want it to evolve not vanish then appear as something entirely different.
Doing it slowly  seeing what is there by letting it flower gives you chance to view the whole border and then move plants for colour or effect, it also gives you time to sit and plan or just look without feeling you should be at it every spare hour.
One bit of advice I would give is after last years wash out, the soil will be hungry, a really good granular feed and mulch will put life back into the ground and gives the coming plants a boost, we all need a tonic after last year, my personal one comes from Scotland.
Good luck Frank.

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