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Palaisglide


Latest posts by Palaisglide

Strawberry Pots-What Size Please ?

Posted: 09/04/2014 at 14:35

NewBoy2,

1) Correct was an engineer all my life. Now retired.

2) a six inch pot is six inches up down sideways on end.

3) A sheltered spot can be up against a wall, under a bush beside a fence, they are hardy and overwinter outdoors. I bring a few into the greenhouse early spring to get early fruit, you can only do that once.

4) They will grow on in the ground and many do it that way as I did when I had stacks of room, as my old Dad used to say sow one row for the beasties, one row for the birds and two rows for yourself, he would finish we all have a purpose and all have to live. We are discovering now you cannot live without insects and other members of the food chain including us if lions are loose.

Frank.

Strawberry Pots-What Size Please ?

Posted: 09/04/2014 at 10:18

NewBoy2,

1) It is best to put Strawberries up high to escape the snails and they still get there, low down you can lose the lot in a night.

2) If they are new plants they do not fruit well the first year six inch pots with good compost will do.

3) I find using 9inch deep trays about four feet long with plenty of drainage and good compost best for second year plants four to a tray.

4) once fruited put pots or trays in a sheltered place and let them rest any runners should have been put in pots and held down until rooted then cut from the mother plant and grown on as above.

5) Clean up the plants in Autumn and put back in a sheltered place ready for the next year, I check the roots at this time too

6) two fruiting years is the norm though I have had five from some plants. Better to take as many runners as possible and increase your bed that way with fresh plants.

7) Midnight raids with a torch and a bucket of water with what ever you use to kill the little blighters and you will still lose some even on staging.

Good luck Frank.

Tomatoes - in or out

Posted: 08/04/2014 at 19:47

Orchid lady, ventilation is crucial for all plants, the more vents the better, 25 is a good setting though with mine being South facing I am out opening vents and doors as it is also sheltered from the cold Northerly and Easterly winds we get straight off the North sea. If yours is in a more open position then you may be closing one side opening the other, depends on wind direction. If you are out all day better to be cool than baking set the openings before you leave.

Frank.

Tomatoes - in or out

Posted: 08/04/2014 at 17:27

Orchid Lady Hello, it has been a busy time although as some friends contacted me on the personal message board I thought it best to assure them all I had not gone to the big parade ground in the sky.

Depends on your greenhouse really, a free standing greenhouse of what ever size takes a lot of heating, mine is wall mounted an a south facing brick wall that takes in the heat even in winter and gives it back at night. My reason for several buckets of water is to use them on the plants, our water is very soft and the rain over Teesside quite acidic. The water warms up and gasses off lovely for young and tender plants, in hard water area's I would use rain water from my butts.

A sand bed takes care of seeds and seedlings, shelving on the brick wall takes care of plants a bit tender and fleece or bubble wrap keeps the warmth where I need it, add a frost guard fan heater just in case and it is a belt and braces job.

We all had to learn and asking questions is the way to do that, do not be shy and you can bet someone else will be looking for the same answer, that is the beauty of this forum, mainly friendly.

Regards Frank.

acer mapel

Posted: 08/04/2014 at 17:08

Correct, it was the Rhododendron thread with a time limit.

I do not see the point of digging round the root ball and loosening it up for the wind to bowl it over, may as well disturb it once then leave it to settle down again.

Frank. 

Good draining compost

Posted: 08/04/2014 at 14:36

Sand and fine gravel mixed with potting compost, around half compost to the sand and gravel, then just cover the seed lightly and they will need some warmth 18-20 degrees. They are a bit hit and miss taking up to three weeks to appear.

When ready to be planted out in a sunny border add manure and compost as you plant.

If you put the roots in boxes under glass in March you can take root cuttings a month later by far the quickest way to propagate. Watch out for Aphids when you put them out.

Frank..

acer mapel

Posted: 08/04/2014 at 13:32

Fleurisa, Supernoodle, Correct if you have a year or so to plan it, J.J. does not have the time as it seems his new drive is going in.

Needs must and having had to move stuff from garden to garden in rapid house moves, (sold much faster than we thought) I know it works.

Frank.

Tomatoes - in or out

Posted: 08/04/2014 at 13:26

John, yes as I like keeping buckets of water in my greenhouse to warm and put on the young plants also to gas off, we have very soft water here and I find it better to use tap water than the chemical rain that falls and fills the water butts.

Dovefromabove "Missed" I doubt it, there were those who thought my old fashioned ways well outmoded, years of learning and hard work are not swept aside by modern very expensive methods that usually do not have the success expected, double digging still has its place.

Thank you for the welcome anyway, nice to know you have friends.

Regards Frank.

acer mapel

Posted: 08/04/2014 at 12:09

The sap will be rising now so best left until October November.

Anything can be moved as we see at Chelsea, fully grown trees are often on show though cranes are needed.

Your Acer can be moved and the advice is always the same.

As big a root ball as you can get or handle, wrap it in plastic then move it to a prepared hole. Make sure it is well set in and water very well to settle the soil around the root. It will need staking for a year to let it bite into the ground. A bucket of water every day for a week and five minutes on the prayer mat should see it OK.

Good luck Frank.

Tomatoes - in or out

Posted: 08/04/2014 at 11:16

Tomato's need minimum 10C and maximum 20-30C, depends on where you are really, here on the North East Coast one foot in the sea it is still a bit early unless you have heat in the green house or as I have a sand box with heating.

Place young plants which should be in 4inch pots in a warm area of the green house at floor level, often ten degrees warmer than higher up, cover with fleece at night and take that off in the morning, "I know hard work" a minute or two in the greenhouse before going to work and after sooths and brings you down from the tensions of work.

In my case a sand box with warming cables and thermostat means you do not have to waste heat on the whole greenhouse and shelves above the sand box means you can lift the plants above the heat whilst starting more in the sand, I surround it with bubble wrap to keep the heat in.

Once the plants are in the 12 inch pots on the floor a minimum heat frost guard keeps them happy, heating is costly and wasteful so use fleece or bubble wrap to contain the heat that builds up during the day. Ventilation is also very important.

Frank.

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