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Paul N


Latest posts by Paul N

Leaning Tree

Posted: 17/04/2012 at 22:41

I agree Ron. Paul needs to look up TIRFOR JACK. After digging a small trench on the 'high side' (ie the right side in the image) and cutting through a few roots, a stake needs to be hammered deeply into the ground and tree and stake connected to the tirfor jack. Then the tree can be winched into a vertical position. He will also need to insert a couple of poles on the low side to prevent the tree from slowly creeping back to it's original position. 

Talkback: A rose by any other name...

Posted: 17/04/2012 at 19:42

Would it be 'Oranges & Lemons'?

when to take fuschia cuttings

Posted: 17/04/2012 at 19:04

When I pruned my fuchsias a few weeks ago, rather than throw all of the stems away I took about twenty cuttings, all about 4" long, above and below a node. All have taken and growing away nicely. I did place a poly bag over the tops for a couple of weeks but they have since been taken off.

moving established rose

Posted: 17/04/2012 at 19:01

When they are dormant. The bare rooted roses you buy from November onwards were growing in fields days before they was dug up and sold to you, so anytime between November and Easter as long as the ground isn't frozen or waterlogged.

Talkback: How to take rose cuttings

Posted: 17/04/2012 at 18:57
I found that when taking rose cuttings the conventional way ie a slit in the soil with a spade, sharp sand or grit in the bottom then insert cutting, never worked with me so last summer I began using the method above but using Perlite instead of grit. I took cuttings in July, November and again in February, keeping the compost moist, and have had a very high success rate, probably 90%. As you say they need a good year in the pot before potting up, plus a further year in their individual pots.

Talkback: A rose by any other name...

Posted: 17/04/2012 at 18:51
James
Can you please tell me the variety of the rose you call 'Rosa Euggghh'? I quite like it.

Named Roses

Posted: 17/04/2012 at 18:41

http://apps.rhs.org.uk/rhsplantfinder/plantfinder2.asp?crit=Martin&Genus=Rosa

Surely you've looked here, the RHS Plant Searcher? There are three 'Martins' listed and many more plants with that name. The roses are 'Henri Martin', 'Martin Frobisher' and 'Rémy Martin'.

magnolia

Posted: 17/04/2012 at 12:22

Lorea

As has been said, most magnolias just do not enjoy alkaline soil. Mulch with ericacious compost, feed with the appropriate feed and water with rainwater. It should respond even if it won't be entirely happy. I have a rhododendron in chalky soil which flowers so it can be done.

moving a red robin

Posted: 17/04/2012 at 11:39

Alternative you could prune the shrub and keep it in it's present position.

magnolia

Posted: 17/04/2012 at 11:37

"Magnolias prefer acid soil but most types will do fine in mildly alkaline soil provided they have plenty of moisture until they are well established".

Our Magnolia stellata is very healthy and happy here on the chalky North Downs, although as far as Magnolias go, I think this is the exception. Also ours is in the middle of an 18" high raised bed.

Discussions started by Paul N

Carol Klein's Glebe Cottage

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Himalayan Balsam

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Giverny in September

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Robinia pseudoacacia 'Frisia' problems

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Globe Artichoke

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Last Post: 26/04/2012 at 23:53

Keukenhof

Replies: 2    Views: 391
Last Post: 25/04/2012 at 14:36

Britain's Oldest Rose Bush

Replies: 4    Views: 1051
Last Post: 27/04/2012 at 08:31
8 threads returned