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paull2


Latest posts by paull2

1 to 10 of 68

Filling in lawn centre-piece

Posted: 11/07/2014 at 10:20

Thanks DM. No 'quick fix' unfortunately. I think I have my work cut out for me here.

Filling in lawn centre-piece

Posted: 08/07/2014 at 19:20

Thanks. Not so much bothered about the 'buried bodies' effect ( should get the neighbours talking though!) as much as the settling of the fill-in. Should I use lots of rubble tamped down successively plus topsoil etc? And should I wait for months for it to settle (and do top-ups) before seeding? I suspect I should have more patience than I usually have.

Filling in lawn centre-piece

Posted: 08/07/2014 at 16:23

I have a circular feature in my lawn consisting a depressed ( by about 10") gravelled centre contained by stone edging with a pedestal and sundial in the centre; and surrounding this a 2' band of 'flower bed' planted with dwarf shrubs. The whole thing is about 7 or 8 feet in diameter with a single step down 'entrance' at the front. The feature worked well for several years but recent wet winters flood it for days on end and the shrubs have all begun to die. I want therefore to fill-in the feature, level it with the rest of the lawn and put the pedestal/sun dial on a central flag stone so that it will be relatively easy to mow around it. Question is how best to achieve a lasting level surface to restore the lawn. I have found in the past that filled-in flower beds always sink back somewhat after time,leaving a awkward depression to mow.

Morus nigra

Posted: 16/06/2014 at 19:01

Slow growing and doesn't mind a bit of shade. My King James' seems happy planted in a lawn. Lovely rich fruits when fully ripe and the leaves turn a fantastic golden in the Autumn. Because the fruit is carried tight under the leaves, they don't seem to suffer as much from bird attention as ,say, cherries. You get a fair chance of harvesting most. Would like to try a white mulberry.

Beetroot problems...

Posted: 12/05/2014 at 11:08

The roots tend to get a battering when you transplant, and beetroot, as has been said, dislike that. Sowing or transplanting into peat pots, prior to eventual planting outside, would help this. Recent rough weather doesn't help either. Yours should recover as the weather gets warmer. Watch out for slugs!

Growing chilies

Posted: 12/05/2014 at 10:56

There are 1000s of different types of chilli/pepper, and some are more robust and easy to grow than others. That is part of the enjoyment. Like you, I find it difficult to grow the size of peppers you find in supermarkets but yours will taste better. Some will happily grow outside in the summer but the hot chilies prefer good warm GH conditions. Generally, they like consistent warmth, good light, good compost, water and feed when the fruit sets. Don't overdo it, though.

Carrots not germinating

Posted: 11/05/2014 at 14:19

Ditto with the non-performing carrot seed. Admittedly mine was older seed but the conditions on sowing were pretty good, I thought. Parsley (flat leaf) can be another hit and miss experience. I took the tip this year of soaking the seeds overnight or so before sowing under glass cover (in an old Belfast sink) and the outcome has been quite good. Tried to sow celery seeds -- in a propagator -- back in March without much success. Reused the compost outside and guess what's coming up weeks later?

Compost!

Posted: 11/05/2014 at 14:11

Don't be afraid to put skip-loads of paper and cardboard in with the green stuff. The end result will be a better crumbly texture of compost. Too much proportion of green (yes avoid weeds anyway) makes for a slimy mess. On the 'nettle tea' subject, I'm not yet convinced. I tried making this plant food last year - enduring the pungent smells - but I can't say it made any obvious contribution to cropping which many chemical solutions seem to produce. I'd be interested to hear further.

courgettes

Posted: 11/05/2014 at 14:00

Perhaps I've been a little reckless but I've had half a dozen Black Beauty courgettes outside for three weeks - in containers and a sheltered position (excepting the current strong winds) -- and they seem to be fully OK with it. In the past, I have had problems with splitting stems when planting out but, so far, OK.

New Plum and Pear trees

Posted: 10/05/2014 at 19:14

Victoria has to be an obvious choice as they are a reliable, heavy cropper and lovely fruit. Depends how many you are able to plant. In addition to Victoria, I have a Damson 'Merryweather' and a brute of a plum called Excalibur which tastes gorgeously spicey but the tree is a robust grower, takes up much space, and the cropping not so reliable. My next choice would be a Gage. Love the taste.

1 to 10 of 68

Discussions started by paull2

Filling in lawn centre-piece

How to fill-in area and restore to lawn 
Replies: 4    Views: 131
Last Post: 11/07/2014 at 10:20

Fig crop drop

Figs dropping before ripening 
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Sweet potato

grow from sprouting peel? 
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Dragon fruit

cultivation 
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Tomatoes not setting fruit

Plenty of flowers but few fruit set 
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Split stem courgettes

What causes split stems 
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Last Post: 05/06/2012 at 09:38

Cherry picking problem

What's eating my cherry leaves? 
Replies: 3    Views: 509
Last Post: 21/05/2012 at 12:19
7 threads returned