London (change)
Today 6°C / 3°C
Tomorrow 5°C / 3°C

Pete8


Latest posts by Pete8

1 to 10 of 453

Sowing lemongrass seeds

Posted: Today at 13:05

Never tried growing from seed but I had reasonable results using lemongrass from the supermarket.

Just pop the stalks into a glass with some water in it and within a couple of weeks roots appear, then pot up as usual.
I kept mine growing for several years in 12L pots, bringing in  in the winter and leaving them almost dry in an unheated room, then back out when frost has finished. Feed very little or you'll just get very long leaves.

The stems never really thickened-up much and the flavour was not as good as the stuff grown in thailand, so in the end I gave up.
The leaves make very nice tea!

good luck!

No good asking nicely...

Posted: 14/01/2016 at 13:00

Thanks Tetley - a lovely spot to sit and think - with a cuppa of course

No good asking nicely...

Posted: 14/01/2016 at 12:37

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/98887.jpg?width=360&height=350&mode=max

 

Over the 25+ yrs I've had a pond I've lost loads of fish to herons.

I've now got just 3 huge koi - the heron doesn't even try his luck any more with them.

To keep the buggers at bay here are some that have worked for me.
The water scarer does work, but also works on anyone walking up the garden too. But mine didn't last more than a year or so, and frequently leaked.
I planted a spikey low-growing conifer (some sort of juniper I think) all around the edge of the pond which now gives me about 3ft of spikey surface around the pond. The herons wont attempt to step onto it.
Use black fishing line attached to little stakes. One at about 9" above ground and the other about 12" with about 18" between them.
Or - get an air-gun

The ornamental heron won't work during the breeding season (now) - they're looking for mates. It can help at other times, but you'll need to keep moving it about every couple of days - they soon wise-up

No good asking nicely...

Posted: 14/01/2016 at 12:36

Over the 25+ yrs I've had a pond I've lost loads of fish to herons.

I've now got just 3 huge koi - the heron doesn't even try his luck any more with them.

To keep the buggers at bay here are some that have worked for me.
The water scarer does work, but also works on anyone walking up the garden too. But mine didn't last more than a year or so, and frequently leaked.
I planted a spikey low-growing conifer (some sort of juniper I think) all around the edge of the pond which now gives me about 3ft of spikey surface around the pond. The herons wont attempt to step onto it.
Use black fishing line attached to little stakes. One at about 9" above ground and the other about 12" with about 18" between them.
Or - get an air-gun

The ornamental heron won't work during the breeding season (now) - they're looking for mates. It can help at other times, but you'll need to keep moving it about every couple of days - they soon wise-up

I tried to upload a pic of my pond but for some reason I just get a blank box if I click on the 'add photo' icon.... I'll try later

basil

Posted: 13/12/2015 at 08:56

What sort of lighting are you using and how far above the plants?

Are you growing in hydro or soil?

20° is not warm enough for basil - Basil is a native plant from India, so you'll need more warmth

Lots of IDs please :-)

Posted: 17/11/2015 at 10:53

22 - tracheospermum jasminiodes

19 Jasmine

9/10  viburnum - possibly v. opulus

15 Blackcurrant?

13 Hebe

Lots of IDs please :-)

Posted: 17/11/2015 at 10:38

Can't zoom in so can't see the leaves properly but

2 - maybe rosemary

5 - maybe a bay or laurel

6 - some sort of berberis or firethorn

8 - looks like a periwinkle

that's my tuppenceworth..

growing

Posted: 16/11/2015 at 18:27

I planted a grapefruit seed in 1968 at the tender age of 10.

I had the tree for many years and it grew to about 3-4ft. It flowered regularly in late winter/early spring (in the g/house) and often tiny grapefruit would appear, but they got no bigger than a marble.

The scent of the leaves and flowers is wonderful.

I think I abandoned it around the time I discovered beer 

 

Birch in hot climates

Posted: 06/11/2015 at 18:05

From what I've briefly read, Beutla nigra Heritage has a similar heat tolerance and google did show many uk suppliers

Birch in hot climates

Posted: 06/11/2015 at 17:08

Very nice too.

Mind you it 17c outside at the mo here is essex,uk - not very November-like

The Wiki says that the birch I mentioned above is the most tolerant of heat - have a look the the variety Betula Dura-Heat, may be worth a try.

Most of the leaves have now fallen from the sliver birches that abound round here, but it's been a great autumn for stunning colours.

1 to 10 of 453

Discussions started by Pete8

Tree/shrub ID please

plant ID 
Replies: 5    Views: 289
Last Post: 08/07/2015 at 20:12

Arum maculatum, cuckoopint, lords and ladies

Replies: 11    Views: 2134
Last Post: 04/04/2015 at 13:50

Any idea what this is?

Replies: 15    Views: 803
Last Post: 05/10/2014 at 17:15

Need to move wild bees on

wild bees 
Replies: 6    Views: 471
Last Post: 25/09/2014 at 12:47

Baby cyclamen

growing on seedlings 
Replies: 6    Views: 605
Last Post: 22/09/2014 at 08:43

When to move Salvia Amistad

moving perennial 
Replies: 22    Views: 2852
Last Post: 08/02/2015 at 21:54

Sweet William

What to do with Sweet William 
Replies: 6    Views: 867
Last Post: 06/08/2014 at 20:07

Cottage garden borders and floppy perennials

Replies: 9    Views: 688
Last Post: 20/07/2014 at 21:51

Tomato plug plants - any good online suppliers

online suppliers of tomato plugs 
Replies: 8    Views: 675
Last Post: 22/04/2014 at 22:31

Bootlaces = honey fungus?

apparent honey fungus but susceptible plants thriving for years 
Replies: 2    Views: 1304
Last Post: 05/10/2013 at 21:02

Tree stump removal

Tree stump removal 
Replies: 9    Views: 1491
Last Post: 09/02/2014 at 10:58

No videos

Cannot see any videos 
Replies: 10    Views: 933
Last Post: 09/02/2014 at 17:13
12 threads returned