quercus_rubur


Latest posts by quercus_rubur

more coming soon

Posted: 24/06/2012 at 18:14

Added a bit on mine too.The only bit I'll add in my defence to the cat-haters is that, having never owned a cat, I took in a stray last year, who turned out to be pregnant . I kept one kitten. However, I kept both in till he was 6 months old and they don't stray, are both micro-chipped, and never allowed out at night. My bird feeders are in places they can't reach. I have had to net my raised beds as when I put up a fleece tent earlier this year they both thought it was a nice little house to keep the rain off them. I find the old squirt with water trick helps to keep them off too. Cats can be trained, it's mainly the owners who are the problem. If I ever find out who owned the mother, I'll present them with a bill for £500, which is what it cost in vets bills for 4 kittens.

I have my first courgette!

Posted: 24/06/2012 at 17:48

Goodness Obama's heard about my courgette! 

Should my bargain do this?

Posted: 24/06/2012 at 17:34

I'd repot it, or plant it out, and add some bonemeal. When plants outgrow their pots the flowers often fall over. It's probably root-bound. It does look like an Oenothera

I have my first courgette!

Posted: 24/06/2012 at 17:30

Just been out pottering in between rain showers and noticed I have my first courgette! It's the first year I've grown them and given the poor results from most of my veg I wasn't expecting much. However, there's a fruit about 2 inch long and another one looks like it's about to form. I planted 3 plants and potentially they all look like they'll fruit. Quite excited!

Mice

Posted: 24/06/2012 at 17:21

As long as they don't come in the house I'm content to let them be.. I think I'm turning into a Buddhist ,I really don't like killing anything. Plus if you claim to garden for wildlife - as I do - you have to take the cute and beneficial with the not so cute and beneficial. Regards cats bringing in stuff, I have a cat flap that only works with their microchip. While Mum cat isn't bothered about catching anything, the son chasing anything that moves - mainly leaves and flies fortunately - but negotiating the cat flap seems to deter him from bringing stuff into the house. Plus it stops other cats wandering in.

Anyway they say you're never far from a rat so I imagine it's pretty much the same with mice.

Gardeners World - not back for 4 weeks!

Posted: 24/06/2012 at 17:08

Gald to hear your enthusiasm Leggi! I was a young gardener - once upon a time  - and even then it was Gardeners World and Gardeners Question Time that taught me the basics. Please don't say tiddly winks too loudly or you'll put ideas into some non-gardening sporting fanatic in charge of Friday night programming schedule.

 

Will anything benefit from these old pipes?

Posted: 24/06/2012 at 16:01

I was going to say Grass Snakes if you provide a warm environment, but if you get Pine Martens then maybe you're too far north?

I like the burnt wood sculpture btw

Plants for wildlife

Posted: 24/06/2012 at 15:51

If they're new plants presumably they won't yet have many flowers on them? They'll make - pardon the pun - a beeline for the plants with plenty. While I haven't seen many butterflies I have had lots of bees on well established plants. Ceanothus and poppies last month provided the main bee bistro. This month it's Geranium Johnson's Blue and Escallonia that are proving irrestible. All these are well established plants with an abundance of flowers. The exception is a newly plantd Knautia with half a dozen flowers on. Poor thing must be exhausted by now as the bees have been virtually queueing up. Be patient. If you plant them, they will come 

Talkback: How to lift and divide hostas

Posted: 24/06/2012 at 15:38

I'd generally divide in early Spring, but as Janeys says you don't have to be precious with them. I accidently pulled a small clump of leaves off one in May so I shoved it them in a pot with a sprinkling of bonemeal. The outer 2 leaves died off but the rest of the clump rooted very quickly.

My Garlic look more like shallots

Posted: 24/06/2012 at 15:32

I grow mine in pots these days as I never had much success growing them in the ground. They are hungry plants, but having dug a couple out yesterday that were suffering a bit, well they're ok but as one of them is Elephant Garlic let's just say it won't be killing anyone of it decides to stampede. 

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