Rekusu


Latest posts by Rekusu

1 to 10 of 38

Gate post repair

Posted: 18/06/2017 at 17:02

Have pulled the bottom bits out now.  One almost totally rotten, the other, only the upper third, the deepest part seemed OK.


But in cutting the posts near the ground level, the wood is pretty well 'dry' rot for the first few centimetres.  Not sure the easiest way forward, but think I will install the concrete repair spurs and the existing posts.


Next year, if I feel like some further work, can replace the posts  which as they will only e bolted to the concrete, will be easy to remove.

Gate post repair

Posted: 18/06/2017 at 12:50

That is my feeling too.  I can just see that with the limited size of the hole, getting PostCrete behind will be a challenge.


But then, if a job is worth doing, it's worth doing well.

Gate post repair

Posted: 18/06/2017 at 12:22

What ho possums!  


The 100 x 100 wooden posts supporting the back garden gate have rotted at the bottom (there is a surprise!)  Am fixing with concrete spurs set into the ground with PostCrete and bolted to the existing wooden supports, which are OK above ground.  


Having dug out a 300mm x 600mm hole for the supports, the PostCrete will go around three sides of the concrete post but the forth side is the existing, rotting wood. 


Should I remove this wood and pack PostCrete around the back?  YouTube videos do not even suggest doing so, let alone even mention the old wood.  


Toodle pip and thanks  


Rex

Replacing Gate Posts

Posted: 13/06/2017 at 12:32

Gentlemen,


Thanks for the replies.  I have used spikes for plant supports in the past; the difficulty on my opinion, is when the spike hits a stone / brick / tile or whatever the builders in the past decided to throw onto the ground.


The is one reason I am somewhat against spiking these posts as it would be good to keep the fence and gate at the same measurements.  My feeling is towards Postcrete because I can hopefully get the posts in t he correct position and then spade in the Postcrete around them.


But I do agree that with a post a few feet into damp(ish) ground) the long term rot factor is quite high.  On the other hand, while I agree that 'treated' is just a term for given a quick wash with some watery brown gunk, by the time I have treated them with bitumen and oil, hopefully then would last longer then the current ones have.  Don't think the current Postcrete has aay haunching.


By which time, I will be too old to concern myself with DIYing it again!


Is it likely that I could clean out the current holes in the existing Postcrete and that a new post will just drop in?  Maybe have to give the bottom of the post a bit of a shave?

Last edited: 13 June 2017 12:33:56

Replacing Gate Posts

Posted: 13/06/2017 at 11:20

What ho one and and all,


The two posts, supporting the back gate have rotted at the bottom so a new job to the list is to replace them.  They were professionally installed with Postcrete, about ten years ago.


I am intending to use 100 x 100 treated posts, which I will paint with used engine oil at the base.  My problem is, given that nothing lasts forever, what is the best way to extend the life of these posts.


It is a somewhat damp area.


My options are:


a/ remove the existing Postcrete and replace post in the ground with more Postcrete


b/ drive a post anchor into the ground so that the replacement posts will not be in the ground 


c/ use a Drive-in Repair Spike (http://www.toolstation.com/shop/Landscaping/d130/Fence+Post+Metalwork+%26+Tools/sd3224/Drive-in+Repair+Spike/p69167) presumably with Postcrete again to stabilize the base.


Not sure how the latter is supposed to work and whether driving the post into a taper is better than clamping with a Post Anchor?


Grateful for any suggestions.


Thanks and toodle pip

Garden gate

Posted: 17/03/2017 at 20:08

I understand; thank you.

Garden gate

Posted: 17/03/2017 at 15:05

Good point; don't know about forever, but I can hopefully see the next 10+ years.


Think I will soak with used engine oil and postcrete them in.  Anything I do should cause them to last longer than the current ones.


Thanks all

Garden gate

Posted: 17/03/2017 at 13:04

I can't use metal as the gate has to be hinged to the posts.  Also, the chain link fencing has to be reattached to the posts.


As drainage is probably the main reason for rotting, I am just running this idea past you all.


Dig out the existing concrete with the intention of replacing the posts in a similar manner.  But at the base of the hole, drop in some gravel or general rubble.  Paint the posts with plenty of oil and allow it to soak in and postcrete the posts back into the hole.  Hopefully, the oil will reduce water absorption and the rubble will allow water to drain away.


Anyone tried it?  Cannot be any worse than doing nothing.

Garden gate

Posted: 16/03/2017 at 20:07

Wow; thanks for the fast response.


I guess you are right about rotting at the top of the concrete.  Am I likely to be able to get another post into the hole in the concrete?  Personally, I think that may either not fit or will be too loose.


I know whatever I do will not last forever, but I will certainly paint the bottom of the posts with copious amounts of used engine oil in an attempt to keep the water out.  I believe the current posts where treated but one has no idea as to how good the treatment was.

Garden gate

Posted: 16/03/2017 at 19:43

What ho one and all,


X years ago, when we bought the property, I had a gate installed at the back, into the neighbouring woodland.


Recently, I have noticed that the 4 x 4 vertical posts have rotted and it is only the chain link fence that is holding everything up.


I intend to replace the verticals, but...............  They are probably set in  concrete so is it possible to dig out the rotten wood and put the new posts into the concrete holes? 


If not, the alternatives are to break out the concrete and start over with new concrete .Or, dig out the concrete and replace use those metal ground spikes which clamp the base of the vertical pole so it is not actually in the wet ground.


Which is the best way forward?


Thanks and toodle pip


Rex

1 to 10 of 38

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