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Sanna


Latest posts by Sanna

9 returned

New woodland

Posted: 07/09/2013 at 15:45

Yes, that makes sense. Have a good weekend!

New woodland

Posted: 07/09/2013 at 15:25

Thanks again for all the advice. Ash self-seeds around here and in addition I will stick to whatever is native and can cope with alkaline soil. Sadly, Beech is not on the list although it is my favourite tree. So:

Pedunculate Oak, Field maple, Rowan, Bird Cherry, Downy Birch, Whitebeam and some Hazel and Dog Rose (in moderation). There is more than enough Hawthorn and also Blackthorn. The good thing is that there is a good "shelter belt" from established shrubs to the East and North and shrubs and some mature trees to the West.

It is not a limestone pavement (that would actually be very nice) and I don't think the soil is that bad as it has had sheep on it occasionally and the size of the weeds is also an indicator? Anyway, I have ordered a soil test kit as we are also planning a grass roof and that needs poor soil...

I think I am now getting a plan together and thanks for all the help. I also will plan in some folk to help plant the trees as we have worked out that we need to do about a 1000.

Did you do any underplanting with bulbs or ground cover or is it better to do that once the trees are well established?

Sanna

 

 

 

New woodland

Posted: 07/09/2013 at 12:48

Thanks Nutcutlet

It will have to be a strimmer as terrain is sloping and with limestone here and there. It seems we can get a grant from the woodland trust (and thus get the bare rooted trees cheaper including tree guards.)

When you say "excavate planting holes" - how big should they be and when would you plant? I have heard either autumn or spring with a preference for autumn but I am not sure that the land will be accessible early enough in autumn.

Sanna

New woodland

Posted: 07/09/2013 at 12:17

Thanks Waterbutts. An interesting point although I can't fathom why the ground would be toxic. The quarry was just for limestone to build the old house and other than that here on the Welsh Border it is mainly sheep and there is not even a slate mine nearby.

It is possible that there are Ash seedlings - I can check that later in the year when the nettles and thistles have died down. Digging around will also be possible then and before the snow comes. No way can you get onto that land at the moment - the "shrubbery" is head high. The butterflies and bees of course love it.

Sanna

Horrible garage roofs

Posted: 06/09/2013 at 16:12

Thank you Charlie November

A very detailed response! The Teamac paint recommended earlier is too expensive - but would work well for a smaller area so I will keep that in mind for future purposes.

I will investigate polycarbonate roofing - they say it is quite strong which it has to be with the amount of snow we get up here.

We could also use grey cladding but I think that will get very hot in the summer and any plants would probably just wilt away.

Who needs garages these days anyway?

 

Horrible garage roofs

Posted: 06/09/2013 at 15:37

Excellent idea, Macavity the Cat. I shall look it up

New woodland

Posted: 06/09/2013 at 14:54

Hi

Can somebody advise how to plant a new woodland within an old woodland? We have about an acre of woodland on limestone facing West and the centre of the woodland is completely devoid of trees but full of brambles, nettles and thistles etc. Some Hawthorn has managed to grow but even that is struggling. There are rabbits but no deer (we think).

How do we clear this area and keep it clear so that newly planted trees can establish themselves? What time of the year is best? How long do we need to keep the weeds down so the trees can establish well?

Don't worry about the wildlife, please. We also have an old quarry which is completely overgrown and which we plan to leave as is - so plenty more brambles, nettles and thistles there!

Thanks, Sanna

 

 

 

Horrible garage roofs

Posted: 06/09/2013 at 14:44

Thank you all!

Sara 4 - that dog kennel roof is terrific and your dogs look lovely, too. Nutcutlet has a point about spending all that time and energy on greening the roofs which might then collapse under the weight. Also, the roof angle might be a bit too steep?

I have now attached a photo of the offending roofs and the first one shows the re-slated barn roofs with the first garage just below the second barn.

I like the idea of a variety of Clematis and they might do well there - and in due course a slower growing EG might help in winter. Russion vine is not an option - I recall it making its way through a pretty thick brick wall somewhere and growing around some printing presses.

Due to the new garage doors (not installed as yet) the whole structures need to be strengthened anyway but re-roofing (whilst it would be sensible) is not an option at present as there is so much else still to do.

The garage doors are going to be grey (to match slate roofs of the barns) and I will clad the white garage walls with larch boards which will also go grey with age. Just leaves the horrible roofs.

How about putting astroturf on them? Or is there a fake moss?

Sanna

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/30620.jpg?width=274&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/30621.jpg?width=274&height=350&mode=max

 

 

Horrible garage roofs

Posted: 31/08/2013 at 21:29

We have 2 big double garages with asbestos style corrugated roofing and a few bits of moss growing on them (moss probably being the best bit of it, but not enough!). They are South facing but shaded by a row of tall Poplars in summer. The roof structure is not strong, so tiling with slate or similar is not an option. (Neither is demolishing the garages as other half very fond of them).

The roofs are in line with our stone barns and step down along the drive, and are sadly well in view of the house. Is there anything I can grow up and over them to hide the roofs? Ideally someting evergreen? And reasonably quick to grow without making its way through gaps into the garages?

By the way, the roof pitch is too steep to allow for a green roof I think. Makes me start to wonder whether there is an artificial medium to put on those roofs?

Any advice most welcome!

Sanna

 

 

 

9 returned

Discussions started by Sanna

New woodland

Preparing the ground 
Replies: 8    Views: 342
Last Post: 07/09/2013 at 15:45

Horrible garage roofs

Advice needed 
Replies: 9    Views: 914
Last Post: 06/09/2013 at 16:12
2 threads returned