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Tim Burr


Latest posts by Tim Burr

is re-cyling your green bin ,a good thing?

Posted: 23/02/2013 at 17:20
Education! Education! Education!

The more people realise that all these chemicals and sprays are not only killing and destroying our habitats and ecosystems but also have an impact on human health, the less people will buy them. Manufactures of these chemicals rely on people's ignorance. The more people know about the issue, the greater impact it will have on people looking for alternative methods.

I do wish Gardeners World on TV took a more pro-active focus on these BIG issues. Geoff Hamilton was also very clear on the benefits of going organic and everything he did revolved around an organic approach. Monty Don does mention organic methods rather sparingly.

In terms of green recycling schemes, perhaps we could all write to our local councils and ask them to only accept green waste from gardeners that use chemicals and pesticides that don't persist in the environment. At least I would be a start.

National DIY chains remove bug killer containing neonicotinoids from sale

Posted: 01/02/2013 at 14:11
Whoops - not sure where those ??? came from. Meant to be dashes...

One thing I did learn last year is that seed producers are coating bulbs and seeds with neonicotinoids in both domestic and commercial flower and crop supplies - the stuff is everywhere! And no doubt, we're all eating and drinking it!

National DIY chains remove bug killer containing neonicotinoids from sale

Posted: 01/02/2013 at 14:00
Also from the Soil Association website

Bee killers ??? the following products contain neonicotinoids

Product

Westland Plant Rescue Bug Killer
Provado Vine Weevil Killer
Bug Clear Ultra Vine Weevil Killer
Bug Clear Gun!
Provado Ultimate Bug Killer Spray
Provado Ultimate Bug Killer Ready to Use
Provado Ultimate Bug Killer Concentrate

National DIY chains remove bug killer containing neonicotinoids from sale

Posted: 01/02/2013 at 13:57
I have just found this text on the Soil Association website, which they say people are free to download and use when writing to retailers:


Letters to retailers

Having found products on their shelves containing neonicotinoids, in late May we wrote to the Chief Executives of B&Q, Wilkinson, Wickes and Wyevale to bring this to their attention, and ask them to consider withdrawing the products. If you wish to contact any retailer, some of the text below maybe useful. Once we receive replies we will also post them on this page.

Text of letter

Dear Sir/Madam

RE: The decline of the honeybee and household pesticides

You may be aware that in recent years there has been a large-scale global decline in the health and size of bee populations, especially honeybees. Indeed in the winter of 2008 it was widely reported that up to a third of the UK honey bee population perished.

There may be no single reason why bee populations are declining so dramatically and clearly more research is needed into this matter. However, one of the major causes is undoubtedly the spread of industrial scale farming ??? which has meant both a decrease in areas of wild flowers and other bee-friendly sites, and an also dramatic increase in the use of insecticides.

In particular, a new group of insecticides called neonicotinoids were first used in agriculture in the mid 1990s ??? exactly the time when colony collapse seems to have started. The evidence that these chemicals may have a link to colony collapse is powerful, which is why they have been withdrawn in several European countries (France, Germany, Italy and Slovenia). However, the UK government has not yet followed suit.

The Soil Association is obviously keen that something is done about the decline in bee numbers, which is why we have been asking for the Government to withdraw the use of neonicotinoids in agriculture ??? over 20,000 people have signed our petition supporting our call.

However, the use of neonicotinoid insecticides is not confined to agriculture ??? this class of insecticide is also found in domestic gardening products such as fly sprays and bug guns ???insecticides based on the active ingredients acetamiprid, imidacloprid, thiacloprid or thiamethoxam are all neonicotinoid class pesticides. Some of these are available for sale on the shelves of your own stores.

With this in mind we are respectfully asking you to consider withdrawing these chemicals from sale. We believe this action would allow you to use your market size and power to take a positive step to protecting the UK???s bee populations. We also believe your customers would react positively, given the concern in the public for the plight of the bees, and indeed this may present you with a positive marketing opportunity. And of course our bees would thank you too.

For our part we have written to your competitors who stock similar products, and publicised the issue of neonciotinoids in domestic products to our members in our membership magazine Living Earth and asking readers to avoid this type of product. We???d be more than happy to meet with you to discuss this further, or provide more information on this subject if necessary.

We do hope you will consider this request seriously, and that ultimately you will take action to withdraw the sale of neonicotinoids. We look forward to your response.

Yours faithfully

National DIY chains remove bug killer containing neonicotinoids from sale

Posted: 30/01/2013 at 23:59
Wickes, B&Q and Homebase have removed from sale bug killers containing neonicotinoids which are implicated in the decline of bee populations. Unfortunately, the National Farmers Union still holds out that there is nothing wrong with bug killers containing neonicotinoid and also sprays are still widely available in Gardens Centres up and down the country. Perhaps us gardeners can start writing to our local garden centres and ask if they will follow suit. A little bit of consumer pressure often does wonders!

kidling? is it worth getting GW subscription on ereader?

Posted: 17/01/2013 at 04:10
I subscribe to magazine and so get free download, which means I can read it on my ipad at the same time other half can read the paper magazine. Has saved us loads of arguments, "You finished with that yet?" After 12 months I give mt old mags to the local Alzheimer's Society who use them for their reminiscence groups.

Laurel plants

Posted: 17/01/2013 at 02:02
Be aware that laurel leaves contain cyanolipids that can release cyanide and benzaldehyde in some quantity when shredding leaves - the smell of cyanide can also be detected if simply hedge trimming - cyanide smells of sweet almonds! Probably little harm in the open air, but the risk is increased if you shred the plant, and then load the shredded leaves in to the car and drive off to the garden recycling tip with the windows shut. The Roman Emporer Nero used water steeped with Laurel leaves to poison the wells of enemies!

Hellebores

Posted: 06/01/2013 at 10:35
Bought some Hellibores yesterday - three pots, quite large plants, do they spread easily/quickly, or do they keep themselves together? Just trying to work out how best to locate/plant them (ie, in a solid group, or spaced a bit further apart).

Flowering plants that like shade

Posted: 06/01/2013 at 10:32
I have a garden where 40% of it is in shade for 6 months of year, reducing to around 5% even in the height of summer (ie no sun ever). However, I still grow sun loving and semi-shade plants there and they still get on -the only difference is that they do tend to grow a bit taller no doubt reaching up for the light. I have relatively sandy soil so it doesn't get too damp and wet. Might be an issue if your ground is shade and wet, for sun lovers. One plant I do grow very well in shade is aconitum or Monks Hood. That is a woodland plant anyway, so it is bound to do well. Just be aware that everything about it is toxic, but so are most garden plants!

Is it too late/early to move perennials?

Posted: 02/01/2013 at 23:47
Siberian Iris (I can see new growth coming up through thicket of last years cut back leaves), Sedums, Dicentra (bleeding hearts), Crocosmia (Lucifer), Geranium (Cranes Bill), potentilla (not the shrub but perennial). I also want to plant in the ground the freebies I rec'd from Thompson and Morgan which moving things around will allow me to do. The freebies are currently in pots on the garden bench.

Discussions started by Tim Burr

Do slug eat thru' carrier bags

Replies: 29    Views: 675
Last Post: 28/08/2014 at 12:45

Crocosmia Lucifer

Early flowering? 
Replies: 29    Views: 1033
Last Post: 06/07/2014 at 19:04

Bamboo in trough

Trimming it down to size 
Replies: 7    Views: 380
Last Post: 24/02/2014 at 19:15

mildew-on-aquilegia-leaves

Replies: 4    Views: 648
Last Post: 12/08/2013 at 09:46

tool-of-the-day

Replies: 10    Views: 466
Last Post: 14/08/2013 at 18:05

loging-in

Replies: 8    Views: 424
Last Post: 11/08/2013 at 18:20

Dicentra (Bleeding Heart)

Gone all scruffy 
Replies: 13    Views: 691
Last Post: 21/09/2014 at 13:41

Japanese Acer disposal

 
Replies: 1    Views: 337
Last Post: 19/07/2013 at 11:02

Pond level dropping.....

...top up with tap water? 
Replies: 15    Views: 906
Last Post: 18/07/2013 at 09:55

Too late for a Chelsea Chop?

Season is 3/4 weeks behind so really, we're still in May, right? 
Replies: 2    Views: 453
Last Post: 16/06/2013 at 13:54

Plant or weed....?

....never seen anything like this before 
Replies: 7    Views: 505
Last Post: 10/06/2013 at 22:31

Gardening errors.....

......made good (or bad) 
Replies: 19    Views: 804
Last Post: 05/06/2013 at 19:50

Flaming Weeds!

Replies: 8    Views: 847
Last Post: 22/05/2013 at 18:43

Stamped on lilies

Big foot strike again 
Replies: 2    Views: 406
Last Post: 05/05/2013 at 22:51

Umbrella Plant

To chop or not to chop! 
Replies: 0    Views: 432
Last Post: 04/05/2013 at 11:12
1 to 15 of 42 threads