Topbird


Latest posts by Topbird

Rotavator vs Chillington Fork

Posted: 07/03/2017 at 16:43

I'm sorry Bob but I don't know what a Chillington fork is either (even after looking at the website). Is it different to a regular border fork?


I wouldn't rotavate an area infested with weeds for the reasons given above. So you either need to use weedkiller a couple of times and then rotavate or rely on a fork to dig them out. The last one is my favoured option but it depends how large the area is!


I also have the Wolf hoe mentioned by Obx above which does a great job of slicing the top off annual weeds on the driveway and between rows of veg etc. but I wouldn't use it for the initial clearance - just for maintenance.


Their 3-pronged cultivator (which slots onto the same handle) has a mini-hoe on the back. It's great for no-bend light weeding between plants in the summer and tickling in fertilizer etc

Hello Forkers - March Thread

Posted: 07/03/2017 at 15:00

I am not a nice person in the morning - more of a horrid grumpy old cow.


La la singing on waking has almost certainly never been part of my make up - OH would want to know what I'd been taking if I started now! I suspect that at Poppet's age I would more likely have thrown teddy out of my cot and shouted at him for waking me up.


OH is under strict instructions to only wake me for 2 things - snow or kittens - preferably together to get it over with

Hello Forkers - March Thread

Posted: 07/03/2017 at 14:05

Have a lovely day with poppet SGL


I don't really think anybody is deliberately ignored on this thread - but it can seem a bit like that sometimes - we probably all feel the same occasionally.


Some people are in a hurry and just post without reading back and so don't comment on previous posts - and sometimes there are 'conversations' going on between 2 or 3 members which results in other postings 'getting lost'.


Chocolate and tea in the bath - nothing like it Got quite a good book as well


 

Hello Forkers - March Thread

Posted: 07/03/2017 at 13:40

Find it hard to sit and twiddle my thumbs when the sun's shining BL - I do try to keep my sensible head on though


Bar of Galaxy in the bath to restore my blood sugar levels I think - is that pampering enough?

Hello Forkers - March Thread

Posted: 07/03/2017 at 13:38

Posts crossed there Obx & BL.


Glad to hear you've both got power back - heard about those winds on the news or weather last night - sounded as bad as (if not worse than) Doris - and that was pretty awful.


Hope things get sorted for you BL. The ATC's do seem to be targeting your trips to & from Norfolk don't they? Not an easy alternative form of travel for you is there? Flying from somewhere like Bilbao or Barcelona would probably be closer than driving to the Chunnel but still not that close for you. How annoying.

Hello Forkers - March Thread

Posted: 07/03/2017 at 13:27

It is lovely out there - quite mild and very sunny. Birds are all a twitter and saw the first bumble bee of the season


Probably a mistake to try to do too much today. Thought I'd move a small shrub - started digging the hole for it to go into and came over all peculiar - very dizzy - not great


Had a sit down with the cat to recover and then did a bit of weeding and pruning, tidied some pots away and cleared & weeded the raised bed which I use for herbs. Not a lot - but probably enough. Time for lunch - then a bath and a sit down by the fire.

Do i need permission from the landlord to start a vegetable patch?

Posted: 07/03/2017 at 11:30

I agree with Joyce - depends a lot on what is there now.


If the garden is an abandoned, overgrown space chances are the landlord either won't give a t*ss or will be pleased to see somebody doing something which tidies it up.


If it is a properly maintained garden with good planting the landlord would probably be furious if you dug up his efforts and replaced it with something which a new tenant might not maintain. In which case he would probably insist you reinstate the old garden.


If it is a tidily maintained but a rather boring fence and lawn type arrangement the landlord might well be amenable if you can show that you've properly thought about how the space would look and can convince him that you will maintain it properly. As Hosta says it is quite a commitment in terms of time and money. Veg gardens can quickly start to look scruffy and uncared for - especially in the winter.


I would look at your tenancy agreement. If that doesn't answer your question - or suggests there might be room for negotiation - I would draw up some proper plans and work out exactly what you want to grow and where and how (raised beds, pots, in the ground, combination of all?). Have you considered the practicalities of watering etc? - is there an outside tap? - can one be put in easily? - who would pay for this?


Once you've worked out all the pitfalls and problems in your own head you will be in a much better position to negotiate and get your landlord to agree. Good luck

Last edited: 07 March 2017 11:31:53

North facing fears

Posted: 07/03/2017 at 11:06

Raisingirl - that was a simply brilliant post!!


SandT - another post of reassurance here. The back of our house faces due north and there is a shadow area extending probably about 6 - 10m from the house which gets no sun at all from September to March.


From March to September, however, there is just a small area in the centre of the wall which gets absolutely no sun and the shadow extends only about 5 - 6' from the back wall in June and July. If we faced NE I suspect the back wall would be quite sunny very early in the morning in summer.


If you are looking for a sunnier terrace I would also put it at the far end of the garden. But, if you can afford to do, it I'd also consider a smaller area (just enough for a bench or a couple of chairs at the back of the house where you can enjoy a sunny early morning cuppa or sit comfortably in the shade on one of those heatwave days (which seem such a dim and distant memory at the moment)

Last edited: 07 March 2017 11:09:25

Hello Forkers - March Thread

Posted: 07/03/2017 at 10:16

Sun's still here Dove - perhaps it's just having a rest in Norfolk. Weather forecast is good for you


Am half tempted to wrap up warmly and start moving that pile of compost which has been looking at me since November and now has stuff growing on it... Sensible head is telling me that's probably a bit too much like hard work at the moment.


Perhaps there are some lighter tasks to attend to for a couple of hours. Then I can come in and wallow in a hot bath before watching another black and white movie in front of the fire (like I did yesterday) without feeling too guilty.


I do a lot of Ignoring with a small "i". Only a couple of people on this forum who are guaranteed to push my buttons but I'm too nosy to not want to see what sort of egotistical rubbish they've been spouting this time.


Fortunately none of them post on Forkers

Shrub help for empty border

Posted: 07/03/2017 at 10:03

Definitely agree with the suggestions to look at the different Eleagnus varieties. I particularly like ebbingei but (as Tetley says) it is vigorous - one I planted 3 years ago is already 2m high - but the leaves are a nice foil for other plants. I will be pruning mine hard each spring and am considering planting a Group 3 rich-purple clematis to grow through it - we will see if that works or not...


I also like the idea of the yellow or other variegated eunonymous - they will brighten that border in winter.


Other shrubs to look at might include Viburnum Tinus and various Pittosporums. The Viburnum is covered with scented flowers early in the year and can either grow into a tree sized shrub or responds well to hard pruning / trimming (I do mine alternate years) to keep it to a bushy 2m high shrub.


There are many different Pittosporums which form anything from low shrubs to full trees. But, again, they can be kept well trimmed (once a year) to form a tidy shrub of the size you want.


As a general rule (and depending on how long that border is) I would go for 2 or 3 larger evergreens interspersed with some others to grow up the fence or to be kept as lower / tidily shaped shrubs (I would include the excellent sarcococca in that last group) and then all under planted with bulbs / hardy geraniums / hellebores - whatever takes your fancy.


Enjoy!

Discussions started by Topbird

Views on Plant Combination - Black Elder & Clematis

 
Replies: 17    Views: 451
Last Post: 01/03/2017 at 14:12

Ideas of Nurseries and Garden Centres to Visit on my hols in the South East

Replies: 8    Views: 878
Last Post: 06/03/2015 at 13:52

Which Currant Bushes Would You Recommend

Replies: 10    Views: 932
Last Post: 28/02/2015 at 13:20

Papaver somniferum seed

Replies: 0    Views: 655
Last Post: 20/06/2014 at 10:35

Papaver somniferum seed

Replies: 5    Views: 1772
Last Post: 20/06/2014 at 22:28

Will Jeyes Fluid harm my Box hedge?

Replies: 4    Views: 3212
Last Post: 16/03/2014 at 21:15

Growing strawberries

 
Replies: 4    Views: 1321
Last Post: 14/07/2013 at 23:02

Harvesting spuds, onions & garlic

Replies: 3    Views: 1667
Last Post: 25/07/2013 at 20:19

Dividing Perennials

Replies: 5    Views: 1310
Last Post: 12/06/2013 at 10:34

Moving delphiniums at the wrong time

Replies: 9    Views: 5467
Last Post: 20/05/2013 at 16:08

Is this Pea Weevil?

Something's chewing my pea seedlings 
Replies: 1    Views: 1111
Last Post: 04/05/2013 at 10:49

Getting rid of daffodils

Rogue daffodils in raised veggie beds 
Replies: 6    Views: 4278
Last Post: 27/04/2013 at 22:12
12 threads returned