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Topbird


Latest posts by Topbird

HELLO FORKERS!

Posted: 26/02/2015 at 11:49

I think the forum had a touch of the lurgy about 5 - 10 mins ago. Couldn't move from page to page and I suspect another posting on another thread has gone astray (rec'd a notification but no posting after mine). 

Hope all poorly peeps are on the mend.

Wintersong - you need to sit down - you are making me tired 

Basil, Coriander, Flat leaf parsley

Posted: 26/02/2015 at 10:56

I find that parsley can be a bit slow to get going from seed so I treat myself to one of the larger pots  from the supermarket in March. I harden it off outside over a few days and then divide it into smaller plants. I usually get about 10 or 12 small plants and just stick them straight into my raised beds (outside) about 6" apart. 

I can start harvesting almost straight away and each small plant quickly becomes larger than the original pot. If I was working with containers I would probably put 1 or 2 small plants per container (depends on the size of the pot obviously).

I have done the same with supermarket coriander and basil but these were not as successful so I prefer to grow these from seed.  

I find that parsley can be cut very hard several times and comes back well over the whole season until the leaves are frosted. Coriander will take 2 or 3 cut backs before it starts becoming spindly and weak so I do successional (usually 3 or 4) sowings to keep it going until the frosts. I find basil quite difficult & temperamental outside unless it's in a really sheltered, sunny spot.

Sadly, a lesson not learned!

Posted: 25/02/2015 at 20:15
I'm with you KEF - no question what-so-ever

Sadly, a lesson not learned!

Posted: 25/02/2015 at 18:15

This thread is ever so slightly freaking me out .... . Mice, rats, rotting rats - can't really deal with any of them - bad news for a country girl!

Definitely a trap for the one in the car - imagine it running over your shoulder whilst you were driving - aaaargh!!

Rats in the compost

Posted: 25/02/2015 at 08:45

I wouldn't get rid of your lovely compost Rusty. If you are concerned about using it to grow veg in (although I don't really think you need to be - the precautions outlined above seem sensible and adequate) - have you considered using it for ornamental borders, hedges or trees instead?

You can use the compost as a mulch in these areas and lightly fork it in so there are no rat droppings left on the surface for little ones or pets to touch. Better used there than dumped at the tip 

You know spring is on its way when....

Posted: 24/02/2015 at 17:16

Wonder if Nigel learnt any new tricks over the winter? - just to upset those who think he dominates the programme 

Lawn mower, 55 and overs needed.

Posted: 24/02/2015 at 16:51

I have to agree that the price brackets given in the survey do not reflect the price of lawn mowers likely to be purchased by over 55's. The very cheap lawn mowers are only likely to be bought by those just starting out in gardening with no money and without the knowledge that you get what you pay for (sorry if that sounds patronising!). The price brackets would have been more sensible at less than £100; £100 - £150; £150 - 250 and over £250.

I did put a comment on the form that the lawn mower I need would not be available for the top price of £150. Last time I looked a replacement model for my mid-range mid-size petrol mower was well over £600 which is why I spend a not insignificant sum each year getting it serviced.

First house, first garden, new gardener!! help/advice needed!

Posted: 24/02/2015 at 16:33

It looks as though the existing path is just slabs. If so, you (someone!) should be able to lift them. If the path has been laid properly there will be a load of hardcore underneath which needs to be dug out. If you like the slabs and need to replace any broken ones near the shed or extend the paving in that area, there is no reason why you couldn't reuse some of the hard core and path slabs.

From the photos it looks as though the existing lawn is quite small and full of weeds. If you are extending the grass area you will need to get it all of a level so I would be tempted to strip away the existing grass so you can prepare & level the whole of the proposed lawn area as one piece - you will get a much better lawn that way.

That is quite a bit of hard physical work there. Not particularly skilled work (except for laying the paving) but hard graft. Can you bribe some muscle with the lure of beer & BBQ?

Make sure that any paving / stepping stones either up to or set into the grass are about 1 cm below the grass level. If they stand proud you will not be able to cut the grass properly & will forever catch the stone with lawnmower blades.

First house, first garden, new gardener!! help/advice needed!

Posted: 24/02/2015 at 13:32

Definitely right thing to do with the buddleia Charlotte - they can become as big as trees if they are not hard pruned each year & the flowers would all be at the top. You will now have a nice bushy shrub with flowers much lower down where you can enjoy them and enjoy watching the butterflies on them.

I think you've correctly identified the other shrub. Some people leave this to grow large and very bushy but I prefer to prune mine hard so there is a better display of larger leaves.

Your design looks very sensible and achievable. It is certainly a good idea to have the stepping stones through the lawn so you can access the shed in all weathers - & much nicer than a straight concrete path.

I think your shed might look rather nice if it was painted - perhaps a french grey  - which you echo with some obelisks in your borders for clematis to climb through. Just an idea 

Discussions started by Topbird

Ideas of Nurseries and Garden Centres to Visit on my hols in the South East

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Which Currant Bushes Would You Recommend

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Harvesting spuds, onions & garlic

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Dividing Perennials

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Moving delphiniums at the wrong time

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Is this Pea Weevil?

Something's chewing my pea seedlings 
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Getting rid of daffodils

Rogue daffodils in raised veggie beds 
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Last Post: 27/04/2013 at 22:12
11 threads returned