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Weed fairy


Latest posts by Weed fairy

6 returned

Star Jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides)

Posted: 17/08/2012 at 11:23

I had just the same problem but had kept mine in a pot. Thought it was a goner in spring so repotted it and gave it some tomato food after a couple of weeks. Lo and behold it is now thriving and covered in flowers - but a bit hard to enjoy the fragrance through driving rain. My neighbour had same thing but we have planted hers out against a wall - and its not dead yet! Think thay are just the sort of plant that goes into a huff - an expensive spoiled child .

Subterranean roots

Posted: 15/08/2012 at 23:39

Thanks Dove. Im pretty sure its honey fungus. Most herbaceous plants are from cuttings and I have the stock plants separately in back garden. My worry is the azaleas and rhododendrons that I have already put in and a couple of little crab apples that I grew from seed that are poised to go in but I would hate to lose.

Subterranean roots

Posted: 15/08/2012 at 16:11

I moved here 2 years ago and front garden was a decent sized square of lawn with no plants at all. I started digging up the lawn and making a spiral border that ultimately will fill the whole space with shingle paths following the spiral shape. Soon after I began I noticed a crop of fungi in a very regular pattern across the lawn. Honey fungus. I was therefore not surprised to find when digging huge fat roots of trees that had been cut down and the roots left. This has resulted in bent forks and a sore back plus the worry about the honey fungus affecting the plants I am putting in. Any thoughts on what plants would be at risk? 

 

Replanting between leylandii stumps

Posted: 15/08/2012 at 16:05

I moved here 2 years ago and front garden was a decent sized square of lawn with no plants at all. I started digging up the lawn and making a spiral border that ultimately will fill the whole space with shingle paths following the spiral shape. Soon after I began I noticed a crop of fungi in a very regular pattern across the lawn. Honey fungus. I was therefore not surprised to find when digging huge fat roots of trees that had been cut down and the roots left. This has resulted in bent forks and a sore back plus the worry about the honey fungus affecting the plants I am putting in. Any thoughts on what plants would be at risk? 

Welcome to tools and techniques

Posted: 14/08/2012 at 19:43

Im looking for a really strong lightweight border fork. My last one was about 70yrs old and inherited from my aunt. Sadly it suffered irreparable damage from an unseen lump of granite. I have since had a series of "good" border forks that end up with bent prongs! Any suggestions?

Please identify this plant

Posted: 18/07/2012 at 00:06

Welsh poppies - meconopsis cambrica. once you have them they will take over which is lovely if all you have are weeds. V hard to control.

6 returned

Discussions started by Weed fairy

Subterranean roots

Potential problem with honey fungus 
Replies: 3    Views: 505
Last Post: 16/08/2012 at 07:44
1 returned