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Welshonion


Latest posts by Welshonion

badgers

Posted: 28/08/2013 at 00:25

Trouble is I've seen many badgers on the roads at night and they are hopeless at self-preservation as they snuffle along the side of the road.  There is nothing worse than seeing them dead on the verge.

Please explain the dichotomy.  I put out food for the birds to attract them to my garden.

I put out food for the badgers to deter them from eating/destroying my crops.

I can't make head nor tail of it!

how-to-compost-chicken-poop

Posted: 28/08/2013 at 00:18

Wow, Debi, how nice to see a post by a Lysaght, there aren't many of us about!

water-butt-location-problem

Posted: 27/08/2013 at 16:37

I move water to butts placed around the vegetable garden when the ones on the drainpipes are full.  You can buy cheap water pumps to move the water from butt to butt or use buckets.

 

badgers

Posted: 27/08/2013 at 16:26

What make you think that feeding them would DETER them?  Would you be deterred if someone gave you free food?

Look to your fences.  It is dangerous for the badgers if they get too used to the proximity of humans.  They are more likely to get killed on the road, going to and fro from your feeding station.

As to holes in the lawn - they made such a mess of our fields when we were farming - you can fill the holes in during the winter when they semi-hibernate.  All ready for them to start again next year.

a-question-about-lilac-trees

Posted: 27/08/2013 at 14:26

It looks very sad.

whats-wrong-with-ash-tree

Posted: 27/08/2013 at 14:24

Be aware that ash trees are prone to 'drop a branch'.  It really is better to have them looked at in case they have reached the end of their life rather than anything getting squished!

Talkback: Frost-proof pots

Posted: 27/08/2013 at 12:45

You can buy frost-proof pots in this country.  Very often hand-made and expensive.

The normal pots that are in every garden centre are usually, but not always, pressed out in a factory in Italy and are not frost-proof.  They are not very robust whether you are in Hampshire or Orkney.

street-cleaning-in-our-cul-de-sac

Posted: 26/08/2013 at 23:51

I think Joyce will find her road is adopted, just that it is not on the road sweeping route.

garden-used-to-be-tarmac

Posted: 26/08/2013 at 16:22

If you will find good soil under the Tarmac, I would remove it.  We have half an acre so we can afford to leave the old playground as Tarmac.  As it is surrounded by old railings we can leave it as a separate area for sitting out, the greenhouse and raised beds.

It all depends what will suit your garden.

garden-used-to-be-tarmac

Posted: 26/08/2013 at 14:08

I would dig a trial hole and see what's underneath.

I live in a converted school and our raised beds, for mainly vegetables, are on the Tarmac because having dug a trial hole we found nasty hardcore laid straight on clay and we reasoned the expense of digging it up and disposing of the spoil was just too much. 

The raised beds are a sucess but they do dry out quite quickly.  But the best thing is having a really good surface to walk on to work from, between the beds.

Discussions started by Welshonion

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Red Kites

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4 threads returned