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Wintersong


Latest posts by Wintersong

May In Your Garden

Posted: 27/05/2012 at 20:28

Well done you! Enjoy it for many years to come

Sh**s Sorrel

Posted: 27/05/2012 at 19:35

Oh, I never knew what this weed was called but I had it in my front garden back in the day when I planted roses. It is very annoying since it seems to have extensive roots with no woody bit to pull out but just very brittle clumps that go really deep.

I eventually moved my roses and maintain my front garden with vigorous weeding almost to the point of extinction, but thankfully, it never transferred to my back garden which was plagued with bindweed instead. Oh the joys of gardening!

What's the weather like in your area?

Posted: 27/05/2012 at 19:28

Glorious sunshine again in Kent, brisk breeze but that's a good thing. Slightly worried about lack of bumble bees in my garden, I hope they are still around, just busy catching up after the terrible spring.

May In Your Garden

Posted: 27/05/2012 at 16:11

@Gold1locks, same things happened to me,

1. Both my Ceanothus regularly sprout from very thick base stems and the pros keep telling us they don't grow from old wood.

2. My Callistemon leavis was totally wiped out after our snow and presumed dead. When I lifted it, I found the base was still alive, so it got potted and left and is now sprouting red buds at base level!

 

May In Your Garden

Posted: 27/05/2012 at 16:03

@Geoff, spot on with focus mostly...

@Inkadog, I have some overgrowing Ivy that's due a prune in the Autumn, its absolutely loaded with black fly and serves a meal for half my neighbourhood birds and insects, but it is a grotty job I'm not looking forward to.

I have spent all day in the garden...doh, who hasn't?

Nipped off the B&Q this morning to take advantage of their special buy one, get one free offer (typically when my plant budget is already blown for this year). Luckily, I have an understanding husband  and went looking for a couple of large shrubs to give my full sun border much needed maturity, in the absence of my Pampas grass.I had a Sambucus and a smoke bush in mind, but could only manage to find the Sambucus, Black Lace. There were no smoke bushes but I'm over the moon to come away with a Eucalyptus Gunii that will add a very beautiful blue-grey foliage to my middle garden and cool down all the hot pinks and reds I seem to be accumulating there. I may well be doing some slight arranging come the autumn, but we'll see how it all pans out. Now I have two structure shrubs, I can work off those much better with the designing part.

Rest of the day's work consisted of  weeding, sitting, weeding, sitting, sitting, planting out my broad beans and runners, more weeding and more sitting. Oh, and watering pots ofc  

Ornamental alliums

Posted: 27/05/2012 at 09:47

That's a real shame Swedboy, both these plants do well in my garden although not without incident this year myself. From two clumps of 6 alliums, I got a clump of nine and a single one. I reckon I might have disturbed the bulbs last year when planting around them, they showed leaf this year but did not flower.

As for my Asiatic lilies, I have always kept them in pots up until this year, when two full pots were transferred to two spots in my garden, one of which has been beset by slug damage much to my frustrations. The winter wet doesn't seem to have deterred them in my sandy soil although I have yet to see how they handle the real test of summer drought directly underneath my mature Eucalyptus passiflora. Next year I will be mulching with grit to prevent slug damage or putting them back in pots, depending upon how they handle the driest months.

Good luck with yours

removing flowers from helebore

Posted: 27/05/2012 at 09:05

Forgive my quirky humoured previous reply. All of the above explains what I chose to omit, but personally, I would allow Hellebores to set seed if only because you cannot have enough of this elegant and garden worthy plant and I rarely say no to a free plant!

I do believe removing old leaves is useful because they can carry fungal diseases or hide emerging flowers and foliage in late winter, although I'm not sure what time of year this job is done.  

I'm a newbie with Hellebore and am still reaserching them

bee or wasp?

Posted: 27/05/2012 at 08:59

Whatever it is, 3 days detention in a jam jar is not doing it any good

bolting onions

Posted: 27/05/2012 at 08:52

The cold spring will be the reason, I don't think you can save bolted veg although you can collect the seed? Don't rip them out before more expert veg growers have commented, but there is still time to plant new crops if that's the only solution

May In Your Garden

Posted: 26/05/2012 at 22:42

@KG, its actually true that hens can change into roosters due to some hormone difference. There have been stories that it is to compensate for lack of males but I'm not sure about this. I don't think the male-hen can fertilise eggs, it just looks and behaves like a guy.

 

Discussions started by Wintersong

Whats wrong with my hosta?

It's half the size of last year 
Replies: 5    Views: 242
Last Post: 14/06/2014 at 15:46

Before and After

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Last Post: 01/06/2013 at 12:23

June in Your Garden!

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Last Post: 22/06/2014 at 13:27

Chelsea!

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Last Post: 31/05/2012 at 21:22

Chelsea Chop

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Last Post: 20/05/2012 at 19:01

What's it like in your garden?

Replies: 6    Views: 629
Last Post: 05/05/2012 at 23:16

Ooh ooh so excited!

New border 
Replies: 11    Views: 699
Last Post: 25/04/2012 at 20:35

Talkback: Informal planting

Andy said "Basically, it’s like a collage of pictures stuck on a bit of paper, except I do it in Powerpoint on a computer." It's an incredi... 
Replies: 2    Views: 436
Last Post: 23/04/2012 at 18:24

Why Miss Bateman?

Clematis 
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Last Post: 17/05/2012 at 19:08

Phormium newbie

Replies: 2    Views: 1124
Last Post: 15/04/2012 at 09:45
10 threads returned