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Wintersong


Latest posts by Wintersong

raised beds

Posted: 28/04/2012 at 11:50

Climbing Hydrangea wont like full sun, its best in a shady spot. Maybe try a vine for green or red leaf colour? Just choose a cultivartor that isn't too vigorous

Tonight's programme

Posted: 28/04/2012 at 11:07

I think that the spring programs should be an hour long, more than summer when everything is growing anyhow. We are straight out of winter and starving hungry for green things I reckon! I work my garden the most hours in Spring and I want design know how, planting ideas, flower porn and a good sniff around other people's gardens. I want to luxuriate in all those plants and projects that might take my fancy and GW always leaves me wanting more

And planty more shots of Nigel!

What's the weather like in your area?

Posted: 28/04/2012 at 11:01

Hehe, I was always blamed for rain in my house because I had been planting out the day before, but this year I can't take the blame! The rain is persistent.

New to gardening and need help!!

Posted: 28/04/2012 at 10:59

Here here Irene Mac and what a lot of work you have! Poor you, but as you say, all that work now will allow your dreams to materialise.

Piccys in the Garden Gallery thread when you see results

April in Your Garden

Posted: 28/04/2012 at 10:53

@Kate1123, talking of slugs and snails...not sure if it's my imagination or what, but I am observing a general indifference to the pellets I'm using (best on the market!) This morning's peruse around my patch caught me seven snails in my Sisyrinchium and a massive fat slug in my Phormium all of which were living quite happily next to the poisonous pellets! I always try to scatter them right inside susceptible plants so as to keep them away from foraging birds etc.

Anyone else making similar observations?

What's the weather like in your area?

Posted: 28/04/2012 at 09:11

Raining this morning here in Kent. Looks like it might decide to do that all day long

April in Your Garden

Posted: 28/04/2012 at 09:07
Koalagirl wrote (see)

There was such a nice pink sunset last night that I was fooled into thinking it may be OK today.

I saw it too, it was beautiful and the first this year!

Gardeners world pond

Posted: 27/04/2012 at 22:51

Alan Titchmarsh did something similar on one of his spin off programs. He cut turf to size and laid its top edge into the water, saying that the grass will draw water from the pond half way back across the exposed liner, the back half of the turf taking its water from the ground as normal.

Don't know if this is appropriate for what you want, but that's how he did it.

Lavender - how to plant/space out so as to let plants thrive?!

Posted: 27/04/2012 at 22:37

You have varieties of what is commonly known as English Lavender. The Munstead is just a bit shorter and more compact.

Lavenders like conditions dry and sunny so you should add lots of grit when planting, especially in containers. They don't like wet feet in the winter so some people sit them on a pile of grit when planting, and don't be too kind to them, they are tough plants really.

The worst thing that happens with Lavenders is that people don't prune them so they grow and grow and get all sprawling and ugly.

Plant them with a space between each plant that is the plants mature size or just a little bit less to keep them neat together, so if the label says its width will be 12 inches when mature, the gap between each plant should be 10-12 inches. And, really, Monty advises to cut them back the first year, to promote good bushy growth.

The idea is to cut back as far as you see new growth, but not into old wood, because they don't grow from old wood. Now is a great time to trim them for flowering late summer and you can trim them late summer to bush them up a bit. but not too late because the frosts will damage tender new growth. 

They grow fast so next summer should see an amazing display.

That's all I know Good luck

Why Miss Bateman?

Posted: 27/04/2012 at 19:18

Early today I was checking my Clematis nose-to-buds when I noticed an earwig bottom sticking out of the support cane. On further inspection, there were two inside that have since been removed. That's a total of three earwigs eating approximately twenty buds between them. Miss Bateman is tasty!

I removed all the support canes and hope to save this beauty further attack. Perhaps a word of warning for novice growers not to use canes with holes in them

Discussions started by Wintersong

Whats wrong with my hosta?

It's half the size of last year 
Replies: 5    Views: 292
Last Post: 14/06/2014 at 15:46

Before and After

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Last Post: 01/06/2013 at 12:23

June in Your Garden!

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Last Post: 22/06/2014 at 13:27

Chelsea!

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Last Post: 31/05/2012 at 21:22

Chelsea Chop

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Last Post: 20/05/2012 at 19:01

What's it like in your garden?

Replies: 6    Views: 664
Last Post: 05/05/2012 at 23:16

Ooh ooh so excited!

New border 
Replies: 11    Views: 738
Last Post: 25/04/2012 at 20:35

Talkback: Informal planting

Andy said "Basically, it’s like a collage of pictures stuck on a bit of paper, except I do it in Powerpoint on a computer." It's an incredi... 
Replies: 2    Views: 464
Last Post: 23/04/2012 at 18:24

Why Miss Bateman?

Clematis 
Replies: 18    Views: 2338
Last Post: 17/05/2012 at 19:08

Phormium newbie

Replies: 2    Views: 1177
Last Post: 15/04/2012 at 09:45
10 threads returned