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www.alittlesliceofeden.blogspot.com


Latest posts by www.alittlesliceofeden.blogspot.com

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Talkback: Turkscap lilies

Posted: 12/04/2012 at 21:23
Is there any sign that the Lily beetles are finding their way to the lillies by smell? I wondered if it might be worth-while crushing up something that smells a bit bad and spraying them with that - Garlic or Euphorbia perhaps, but I'm not sure what the consequences would be more widely. For the moment I'm just going to plant garlic close by and see if that helps. What do you think?

Talkback: Ladybird pupae

Posted: 01/04/2012 at 12:27
The difficulty is that new insects may be better adapted to the current and developing climate. Perhaps we should be accepting the inevitable: the future is not going to be like the past. We may need new insects. I say this with a groaning feeling - I certainly haven't enjoyed the invasion of Lily Beetle!

Talkback: Slugs and snails and pussycat tails

Posted: 13/03/2012 at 13:09

I agree with Ron - I get less slugs since the ponds - perhaps the birds come to drink and then stay for a snack?

Talkback: Garden birds and garden pests

Posted: 11/03/2012 at 20:58
Hi Kate,
You mention that your great tits will soon be back. Mine never went - is this common (West Sussex) and will the long-tailed tits go?

Talkback: Slugs and snails and pussycat tails

Posted: 11/03/2012 at 20:56

I have enormous quantities of slugs and so I plant plants that the slugs will not affect too much. I know that I cannot hope to dent the slug population - even by encouraging blackbirds which is my prefered option. When I love a plant that is slug susceptible like asters I spend a lot of time putting crushed eggshell round them and there is an equivalent rock you can get from the garden centre. Not perfect but helps. Pots help too - but slugs can climb.

Talkback: Moles

Posted: 11/03/2012 at 20:52

This is silly - and don't tell me I've never had moles cos I have. We are facing mass extinctions because of the ever-increasing need to feed our children. That I can understand. Killing animals so that we can grow a monoculture like grass is awful. Dig up the grass, put in some flowers, shrubs and veg. When the moles dig holes they will be less noticeable and you can use the lovely fine soil for sowing seeds in. Who needs lawns anyway?

Planting bulbs in the shed.

Posted: 11/03/2012 at 20:49

I can't see why not - but the air will heat up fast. We'll have to remember to aerate.

Talkback: Preparing for Chelsea

Posted: 11/03/2012 at 20:47
Just up the road from you in Hassocks I think we have pretty well perfect conditions - the thick wealden clay is relatively easy to improve and it stays nice and damp at the bottom of the garden by the stream. The trees provide shade that sweeps across the garden. Problem is that the slugs find the conditions perfect too.

Even so I'm guessing your Chelsea garden will be far more perfect than ours will ever aspire to be. I would love to know more about your colour theme - is pink to be allowed back through the hallowed gates at Chelsea?

Talkback: Making mini ponds

Posted: 18/02/2012 at 18:14
Mini-ponds in pots sound absolutely lovely, but perhaps a little susceptible to changing water temperatures? Best then to put them out of direct sunlight.

I shall have a go for my North facing front door.

Talkback: Dieback on Leyland cypress hedges

Posted: 18/02/2012 at 17:50
The climate is changing and we are travelling. Scary how we now see the impacts around us in such weird ways, but the reality is that every time we travel there is a chance that a fungus or a mould spore or perhaps a Colorado beetle will be travelling with us.

Now that the winters are wetter - or should that be drier - and the summers are hotter (or colder?) our trees and shrubs are getting stressed and that makes them much much more susceptible to whatever little beastie has recently come to visit.

None of this is good news but Natural England decided that the best way to combat climate change is to concentrate on decent biodiversity and resilience - which for gardeners means growing from seeds rather than always clones, and looking after the soil.

I definitely do the latter, but how many of us grow trees from seeds? No wonder Leylandiis are susceptible. There is just one type and no diversity at all.

Once a disease has breached its defences a modern hedge is just a free lunch, so perhaps if a new hedge is to be started it it would be better to start from hips and haws?
1 to 10 of 15

Discussions started by www.alittlesliceofeden.blogspot.com

Talkback: Turkscap lilies

Is there any sign that the Lily beetles are finding their way to the lillies by smell? I wondered if it might be worth-while crushing up som... 
Replies: 4    Views: 356
Last Post: 08/05/2013 at 03:58

Talkback: Ladybird pupae

The difficulty is that new insects may be better adapted to the current and developing climate. Perhaps we should be accepting the inevitabl... 
Replies: 3    Views: 300
Last Post: 25/05/2012 at 22:11

Talkback: Preparing for Chelsea

Just up the road from you in Hassocks I think we have pretty well perfect conditions - the thick wealden clay is relatively easy to improve ... 
Replies: 0    Views: 236
Last Post: 11/03/2012 at 20:47
3 threads returned