Lavatera 'Beauty Mix'

How to grow lavatera

Find out all you need to know about growing lavatera (mallow), in this start-to-finish Grow Guide.

A table displaying which months are best to sow, plant and harvest.
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Sow
Sow

Do not Sow in January

Do not Sow in February

Do Sow in March

Do Sow in April

Do Sow in May

Do not Sow in June

Do not Sow in July

Do not Sow in August

Do not Sow in September

Do not Sow in October

Do not Sow in November

Do not Sow in December

Plant
Plant

Do not Plant in January

Do not Plant in February

Do not Plant in March

Do not Plant in April

Do Plant in May

Do Plant in June

Do not Plant in July

Do not Plant in August

Do not Plant in September

Do not Plant in October

Do not Plant in November

Do not Plant in December

Flowers
Flowers

Plant does not flower in January

Plant does not flower in February

Plant does not flower in March

Plant does not flower in April

Plant does not flower in May

Plant does flower in June

Plant does flower in July

Plant does flower in August

Plant does flower in September

Plant does not flower in October

Plant does not flower in November

Plant does not flower in December

Take cuttings
Take cuttings

Do not Take cuttings in January

Do not Take cuttings in February

Do not Take cuttings in March

Do not Take cuttings in April

Do Take cuttings in May

Do Take cuttings in June

Do Take cuttings in July

Do not Take cuttings in August

Do not Take cuttings in September

Do not Take cuttings in October

Do not Take cuttings in November

Do not Take cuttings in December

Lavatera, commonly known as mallows, are available as annual, biennial, perennial or shrubby varieties.

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The flowers are large, open blooms, in white or pink and are great for attracting bees and other pollinating insects. With their long flowering season, lavateras are good for filling gaps or including in a summer container display.

Browse our handy lavatera Grow Guide, below.

With its long flowering season, lavatera is good for filling gaps or including in a summer container display.

Where to grow lavatera

Grow lavatera in fertile, well-drained soil in full sun. Make sure it’s a sheltered spot out of any cold, drying winds.


Planting lavatera

Lavatera 'Beauty Mix'
Lavatera ‘Beauty Mix’

Sow annual lavatera seeds in trays under cover in early spring. When seedlings are large enough to handle, pot on and harden off before planting out into borders.

When planting shrubby lavateras, dig a generous hole, adding compost for drainage and a handful of mychorrhizal fungi to encourage good root development.


Propagating lavatera

If you want to grow from your existing plant, let some flowerheads develop into seedpods and save the seeds to sow the following spring. Or, you can take softwood cuttings.


Lavatera: problem solving

Shrubby lavatera
Shrubby lavatera growing with buddleia

Lavatera is generally pest-free but can be prone to rust and fungal diseases. Remove affected foliage as and when you spot signs of disease.


Caring for lavateras

Deadhead plants through the summer to encourage more flowers. Cut perennial varieties back in autumn and mulch annually with well-rotted manure or compost. The shrubby varieties can cope with a mild frost, but will struggle if the thermometer dips below -5°C. Prune in early spring to encourage flowers on new season’s growth.

Follow our guide to spring pruning.


Lavatera varieties to grow

Lavatera 'Mont Blanc'
Lavatera ‘Mont Blanc’
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  • ‘Beauty Mix’ – is an annual variety, that produces pink and white flowers on tall, bushy plants, through the summer. The Royal Horticultural Society has awarded it its prestigious Award of Garden Merit
  • Lavatera maritima – also known as the tree mallow, is a fast-growing medium-sized, semi-evergreen shrub. White flowers with a flush of purple appear from spring through to autumn. The Royal Horticultural Society has given it the Award of Garden Merit (AGM)
  • ‘Mont Blanc’ – a large bushy annual plant with masses of huge white, trumpet-shaped flowers, which are extremely attractive to bees
  • ‘Barnsley’ – a bushy shrub variety with soft pink flowers with a darker centre. The Royal Horticultural Society has given it the Award of Garden Merit (AGM)