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21 to 40 of 41 messages
21/02/2014 at 23:33

maybe something nasty to do with gypsies?? Of which I do not approve. 

 

21/02/2014 at 23:39

True story this!  My next door neighbours child put a red berry from an arum in my garden in her mouth and started screaming with the burning.  Her mother, panicking rang the poisons unit in the hospital calling the plant Jack in the Pulpit.  The guy with the big book in the hospital told her he had, I think, eleven plants listed with that name!!  One, I remember, was from Tasmania.  Obviously sorted it out in time, but it always think it is a good example of the very good reasons for trying to engage with the botanical names.

22/02/2014 at 00:10

Gypsophila here, too.  Or now that I come to say it to myself gypsophily which I know isn't right.

as has just been said, the botanical name gives so much help in understanding the plant and it's needs in terms of position, support, soil etc.  for instance, forsythia Formosa comes from a warm forested place so one might guess it needs other tall things to scramble through.  Labradorica would give the idea a plant would cope with cold areas,  and the word racemosa describes it's structure, racemes.  And so on.  But it's great that there is no end to the learning, something like cooking or literature.  Having a name stuck on, like Bowles', or wilsonii, doesn't help much and refers to its discoverer or whoever brought it to these regions.  I believe there is a general guideline in pronouncing the Latin names, and that is , that the second last syllable is the one to be stressed, tho that is far from infallible.  

22/02/2014 at 01:15

I have absolutely no objection to using the botanical name for a plant, but the reason I posted the common name is because I couldn't remember the botanical name.  As I said, it took me a couple of years to stumble upon the name of the plant and when I finally found it I could have sworn I'd bookmarked the page, but evidently I didn't.  Had I remembered the botanical name there would have been no need for me to post this topic!  It had nothing to do with inverted snobbery, just a bad memory.  I had a vague recollection that the page I had seen on the internet about this plant mentioned the fact that it was commonly known as a Bumble Bee plant because of its marked attraction to bees, and it stuck in my head because the very reason I liked the plant is that attraction to bees.  That's all....

22/02/2014 at 08:46

Don't take the discussion re 'proper names' personally pariate.  

Discussion wandered off the original question once it was solved.

Wandering off is a specialty of the forum  

 

22/02/2014 at 08:48

Pariate, Please, please don't think anyone was mocking your use of the common name. It certainly wasn't my intention, nor I'm sure of others. If you only know the common name, then that's good enough to go on, but the thread just developed. Please don't think it was in any way a swipe at you , or anyone else who uses common names. I'm sorry if I caused any offence.

22/02/2014 at 09:10

Pariate - the good thing is that now you know what plant you liked and can ask for it at a GC if you don't see it yourself. I've never heard of it being called Bumble Bee plant and was quite surprised at that as I've never seen it as a plant which was particularly loved by bees, that's why I suggested Cotoneaster! I have a white Escallonia as I don't like the pink ones. I like the botanical names simply because it often gives you the description of the plant and makes it easier if you're looking for something specific online or at a nursery.

I pronounce Heuchera the same way Hostafan. My Dad was a Londoner, but after living up here for a very long time he was able to say 'loch' without any problem! 

22/02/2014 at 18:30

Okay, sorry that I misinterpreted!  To be honest, because I know so little about gardening, I tend to think that all my questions must make experienced gardeners despair somewhat, but was really worried by the thought that I was guilty of a true gardening faux pas! 

Thank you all for your help on the plant, I'm so, so glad I've found it again, and thank you also for your last few posts reassuring me about my last post. 

 

*Trots off to post another thread about planting climbers on supports, hoping that this won't be another obviously newbie question*

22/02/2014 at 18:38

We were all 'newbies' at one time too 

A while back we had a thread about all the daft things we had done in our gardens and the mistakes we had made. It was a great laugh! 

22/02/2014 at 18:46

Glad we've cleared it all up Pairate. As Fairygirl says, we were all newbies at one time. 

Post as many threads as you like. In this weather , it's the nearest we get to gardening. 

22/02/2014 at 19:36
pariate wrote (see)

Okay, sorry that I misinterpreted!  To be honest, because I know so little about gardening, I tend to think that all my questions must make experienced gardeners despair somewhat, but was really worried by the thought that I was guilty of a true gardening faux pas! 

Thank you all for your help on the plant, I'm so, so glad I've found it again, and thank you also for your last few posts reassuring me about my last post. 

 Trots off to post another thread about planting climbers on supports, hoping that this won't be another obviously newbie question*

We like it when we get a few easier questions pariate - it means we stand a good chance of knowing the answers 

22/02/2014 at 20:12

and showing off a bit

22/02/2014 at 20:14

who?  us??

Never .......................................  

22/02/2014 at 20:20

Of course not. Sorry

22/02/2014 at 22:51

I'm sorry if my posts struck a wrong note.  Certainly far from my intention.  

We all have plants we call all sorts of names, perhaps our parents called them that?

and we all have vast areas of unknowing and inexperience and the great thing about this site is that there are people here who do have that experience and are generous enough to take the time to help.  Less preachilly than me, luckily!

23/02/2014 at 00:56

Easy answers?  Showing off?  LMAO.    I dream of the day I can refer to any answer on a gardening question as 'easy'.  I like to think I've made a pretty good effort to educate myself on the basics (isn't the internet wonderful sometimes?) but still feel totally at sea most of the time. 

It's lovely to find such a welcoming, friendly forum.  All too many forums (fora?) are populated by at best slightly grouchy people, at worst... I shan't comment any further.  Maybe that's why I immediately felt I'd done wrong and irritated someone!  The fault is entirely mine Hester, no apologies necessary from you! 

23/02/2014 at 07:33

23/02/2014 at 10:30

Pariate, some of us have been in horticulture as an amateur or professional for many decades you forget some knowledge and acquire other but you never know everything about everything in gardening, there's just so much to learn. But you'll find the majority of people have the same plants, so you quickly build up a idea of what something is likely to be. I got Escallonia straight away only because  I had one in my garden. I still googled it to double check, especially the spelling. You also learn how to get the most out of google. My tip is to be obvious. You're looking for a small shrub with pink flowers. Type that in, that'll bring something along the right lines then you can refine your search again.

01/03/2014 at 18:28

hello, I know this is probably a bit late, but I came across a 'bee tree' on ebay and thought of you, the latin they gave for it is 'euodia evodid daniellii hupehensis'. I couldn't find it in the rhs big book, and hope I hav'nt caused confusion.

01/03/2014 at 19:48

On the pronunciation question, I was once told simply to say each syllable, with equal emphasis on each (clem-a-tis, not clem-ay-tis). But it really doesn't matter how you say it, as long as you can make yourself understood.

21 to 40 of 41 messages