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30/08/2013 at 11:07

Late August's advice from GW includes potting of garlic cloves to get them ready to plant out over winter. I have just dug up this year's crop, planted out in spring, and several bulbs are small and not fully developed into cloves. Can these be left to grow on for next year?

I live in Scotland and over-wintering in 2010 and 2011 resulted in soft, rotted cloves due to the prolonged freeze. What is the best planting schedule under these conditions?

30/08/2013 at 13:20

From what I understand, garlic hates to be planted in boggy earth. Can you put them in pots somewhere protected until next Spring? I always grow mine in pots, plant them in September in a cold frame, and plant them out in Spring. Works for me

30/08/2013 at 13:58

CG, planting a lot deeper than one otherwise would and covering the patch with straw (or similar) is the usual means in those conditions. My ground freezes - probably not to the extent yours does - and it has worked for me.

30/08/2013 at 15:54

I try to plant mine at half-term in late October.

Eat the ones that didn't divide, the best ones to plant are the biggest cloves from the outside of the bulb, but make sure they are single cloves and not double ones inside the same skin.

To be honest, although they are an expense, I am going to buy garlic for planting again this year because I have had an absolutely wonderful crop.  Ditto shallots.

09/09/2013 at 18:34

if you haven't eaten all the undivided bulbs (rounds), you can replant any that are a reasonable size or equivalent weight to your largest cloves. I deliberately plant the bulbils from hardneck garlic in spring to harvest rounds for replanting in autumn - it's an inexpensive way to increase your stock although it takes a few seasons to grow out to normal sized bulbs. On the plus side, that gives time for the garlic to acclimate to your growing conditions. 

17/11/2013 at 19:43

i have read that you can plant garlic at this time of year .is this correct and if so,what are the best varieties and could i plant them in large containers.please can you help me.i am still learning

17/11/2013 at 21:31

"2010 and 2011 resulted in soft, rotted cloves due to the prolonged freeze. What is the best planting schedule under these conditions?"

 

Freezing is what segments garlic. what rots them is crap drainage. I grow all manner of garlic in a raised bed and the ones that I planted in spring have sent up top growth but I am keeping them in the ground till late spring 2014 - they should be larger by then and useful.

I find home grown garlic milder and wetter than the supermarket ones - and all of mine are from supermarket grown garlic bulbs.

18/11/2013 at 18:25

Billdavis aren't we all still learning.

Planted supermarket bought cloves last year. Produced small bulbs, some cloved, some like onions.

The thinking is to buy certified bulbs as these are disease free and are suitable to our climate. i think the ones from colder climates won't break into cloves at all.

Planted French garlic Saturday, Germidour and Thermidour. Planted with a shake of Fish Blood and Bone. Fingers crossed!

19/11/2013 at 18:59

Planted mine about 3 weeks ago, although I am a little worried as the garden is heavy clay and although the bed has a good amount of top soil and compost in it is really wet. No sign of anything yet (the onions have shoots), I hope they haven't rotted.

Might have to consider raising the bed after all.

24/11/2013 at 12:51

I planted some 12 in clay soiled bed and 12 in a better soil bed and all came up quite quickly

Soil is still wet in Good Ol Bristol and still waiting to plant my Autumn Onions

 

26/11/2013 at 14:37

I have planted mine about 8 weeks ago. Last year I used supermarket cloves, 2 cloves  in individual 9" pots (Tesco finest - always large cloves) and they produced smallish but fully formed segmented bulbs.

This year I am doing a small experiment, planting half supermarket and half bought Solent White. I always plant in pots, with my own compost mix aeriated with some vermiculite. I put them in an uncovered mini tiered greenhouse which gets some Winter sun and also plenty of frost to help with bulb clove formation.

So far the supermarket cloves have all started sprouting without exception and the Solents have one or two sprouts but mainly no sprouting yet!

02/12/2013 at 17:21

I didn't know you could plant Super Market Cloves (Thought they had been treated so they wouldn't produce)

 

I'm going to have a go the same 1/2 Supermarket 1/2 shop

03/12/2013 at 12:56

I got fully segmented garlic bulbs from every supermarket clove that I planted last year. I used my own compost with vermiculite so the resulting bulbs cost next to nothing. I planted them all individually into 9" pots. This year I have also planted up pairs of cloves in 12" pots and they are all sprouting. The only thing I've heard about planting supermarket cloves is that they may have no disease resistance but that's not been my experience so far.

Most of the resulting bulbs were about 3 cms in diameter, a bit more difficult to peel than shop bought garlic, but we used the lot over a period of about 3 months and they tasted delicious!

I'm not convinced that I will achieve bigger bulbs from the bought in garlic but we'll see.

03/12/2013 at 15:12

I've got some Marco garlic I planted in early October that is going all guns blazing (still finding it a little odd to have plants growing at a time I normally consider to be hibernating) and I've a few bulbs / cloves left over that I couldn't get into mud owing to the house move / lack of available pots.

Is it too late to get them into the ground now? (Could I for instance keep them in the unheated greenhouse to give them some protection from the elements until they're established and then plant them outside?) Or could I plant them out in spring i.e. February / March to catch the last of the frosts (considering we were still getting snow this year in May) but miss the worst of the weather?

03/12/2013 at 15:52

I think at this stage you should plant the cloves in cell trays then plant them out in Spring once they have produced shoots. You'd still have to keep them outside however, but in a sheltered spot, because as you rightly point out they need a period of cold to grow successfully (maybe a cold frame or unheated greenhouse?)

I have never planted garlic later than October and other more experienced growers may have different ideas to help you.

03/12/2013 at 16:50

Thanks Lancashire Lass. I was thinking it might be worth giving it a shot now and again in Spring (unless someone said it was a complete waste of time) because I don't know how the bulbs would keep for a year (how are you meant to store garlic for planting?) So I might as well try as throw them into the compost bin in June when they've gone a little funky.

 

03/12/2013 at 18:12

My neighbour swears by planting garlic on the shortist day and harvesting on the longest. I prefer to get them in by late October. I am puzzled that every year there are a few thet don't split into cloves, it can't be lack of cold weather because all the others have managed to split. Am a big fan of elephant garlic, it does well here. I then pickle some of the garlic. If anyone is interested I could dig out the recipe.

04/12/2013 at 12:44
Clarington wrote (see)

Thanks Lancashire Lass. I was thinking it might be worth giving it a shot now and again in Spring (unless someone said it was a complete waste of time) because I don't know how the bulbs would keep for a year (how are you meant to store garlic for planting?) So I might as well try as throw them into the compost bin in June when they've gone a little funky.

 

I think you are supposed to plant the cloves as fresh as possible so I wouldn't leave any until Spring (if I have understood your posting correctly?). They all need to be planted ASAP and if you want to try planting in Spring as well (assuming you intend to plant before the frosts have all gone), then you should buy fresh bulbs at that point.

I'm not sure if the suppliers continue to sell through until Spring as I have never bought any at that time of year - maybe someone else can help on that.

04/12/2013 at 14:41

Thank you Lancashire Lass that's very helpful. I wish they'd taught us stuff like this at school! Its so much more use than knowing the social implications over whether the Nazi party was so successful in its formative years because of the support it got off the Church ideals of the time and how this affects us today and how Romeo and Juliet can (if you twist it enough) reflect on the morals of society today!

04/12/2013 at 16:41

Clarington, I so agree; I would happily forgo any knowledge of the Repeal of the Corn Laws for more knowledge about gardening.

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