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28/05/2014 at 17:21
Hi sweet pea 93, I think the 60cm high ones will flower within 1 week, so should be fine. The seeds, usually only take a few days to come through, so 2 weeks seems a long time! Give them another week and if not through buy some plants! Good luck.
28/05/2014 at 17:22

SP93, not even the very first indications of flowers? Absolutely miniature versions that will develop? Some varieties will take longer than others. What varieties are they?

In the meantime, how big are the pots? How warm does it get in the greenhouse?

It's not too late to sow in terms of germination. The seeds should be sown no deeper than they are thick - which is to say, very shallow, just covered with mix. The mix should be kept damp, not wet, and the ideal temp for germination is in the 20sC, warmth preferably from underneath.

28/05/2014 at 17:28

Nope, no indication of flowers, we aren't sure of the varieties because they were missing the label when they came in the post, it was a lucky dip selection... *sigh*

 

28/05/2014 at 17:31
Italophile wrote (see)

SP93, not even the very first indications of flowers? Absolutely miniature versions that will develop? Some varieties will take longer than others. What varieties are they?

In the meantime, how big are the pots? How warm does it get in the greenhouse?

It's not too late to sow in terms of germination. The seeds should be sown no deeper than they are thick - which is to say, very shallow, just covered with mix. The mix should be kept damp, not wet, and the ideal temp for germination is in the 20sC, warmth preferably from underneath.

I'm only new to gardening so they are in a plastic greenhouse, and I've no idea of the temperature, all I know is they've absolutely shot up in the past two weeks like rockets! They're in sizable pots, as for circumference I have no idea, but they are about the size of the pots young fruit trees come in when bought from the GC

28/05/2014 at 18:30

If the grafted one that's flowering is in the same greenhouse then it's probably not the conditions. The pots are okay, too, for the moment. You're just going to have to wait and see. The growth spurt suggests they shouldn't be far away.

28/05/2014 at 18:43

The grafted one is flowing and lives outside, hence my confusion.

28/05/2014 at 21:40

Ah, now I understand. Why aren't the others outside too?

28/05/2014 at 22:05
Because of the harsh weather we are having here. The grafted plant was bought last week from a GC already hardened, OH hasn't started the hardening off process as it's been nasty weather here.
29/05/2014 at 06:52

Okay. Anyway, I've never had a tomato plant that gets to to 60cm not produce flowers. Sometimes you get a runt that never really develops. It ends up on the compost heap.

I don't know how long your growing season is but it might be too late to sow more seeds (in terms of getting fruit before the end of the season). In decent conditions you're looking at 6-8 weeks from sowing to planting out.

01/06/2014 at 11:32

Here's a tomato update from me for those who do / don't have a vague interest...

They seem to have adapted well enough to life in the coldframe (2 weeks now; seeds sown indoors mid-April). I only plan to repot them one more time into their final 25 litre pots although not quite yet.

I'll have to whittle this small forest down to about 12 plants though and I was thinking I should probably do that sooner rather than later before the coldframe gets too crowded . So, any hints / tips on how to spot the strongest plants? Best to look say for a thicker stem but not necessarily the tallest? The tallest ones are largely the seedlings that bolted a bit after germination but I've found in the past that even the spindliest plants buried deeply do just fine.

Thank you!

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/47698.jpg?width=300&height=350&mode=max

 

01/06/2014 at 11:39

Provided they're healthy, the spindly ones always eventually catch up. Given that, in your situation, I'd go for (a) the sturdiest that (b) are the darkest, healthiest green without any blemishes. Can you pass on the rejects to someone else to grow?

01/06/2014 at 11:42

Hi Bf206, they are looking good. As you say, it's probably best to pick the more sturdy and not necessarily the tallest ones. Always a difficult choice! How many plants are you going to put in a 25 ltr pot?

01/06/2014 at 12:33

I started with three 12 cell module trays, one seed per cell, I reckon about 30 germinated well. I think I lost a couple when potting up and have given a few away so am prob 'down to' 25 - but I've only got 12 big pots and frankly that should be plenty!

Dark green's a good tip, italophile. Simon, I'll do one per pot.

I may actually put some outside with an honesty box if I can't see friends who'll take them!

01/06/2014 at 13:07

I'm sure some people who've had trouble germinating or been too busy will be pleased to have some healthy plants at this stage.

25 litres is a biiig pot - over 5 gallons..... you may have room for two plants in one of those.   I have three per growbag of 20 - 30 litres and one per 10 litre pot.  Or plant Tagetes round the edges.  You can never have too many tomatoes.  Sauce. Soup.  Chutney. Puree.  Dried.  You can even wait for them to go rotten and go into politics.

01/06/2014 at 13:23
Tell a lie - they're 20 litres!! I'd previously tried 15 litre ones but found that they weren't quite big enough for a single tom plant. They've currently now got leeks in them until I've got some room in a raised bed...
01/06/2014 at 14:08

You wouldn't want more than one plant per 20 litre pot. Depth of the pot is important, too, if they need staking. Nothing worse than an unstable tomato stake. As I know to my cost.

01/06/2014 at 14:51
Yep I def found 15 litre ones weren't deep enough for a single plant but 20s last year worked very well. Needs a lot of compost, mind!
05/06/2014 at 13:32

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/48228.jpg?width=300&height=350&mode=max

Ok, I'm not too worried (until I'm told otherwise) but I've noticed a few of my plants have got a slight yellow mottling of the leaves - e.g. the big leaf in the centre of this photo.

In practice, it's only on a few plants - and since I still need to cull about half of them, this might just help me decide which to get rid of as it's only affecting a few. I'd got a bit lazy and hadn't propped open my mini greenhouse for the last couple of days, given it was cooler / wetter. I wondered if they might have got overheated a bit, although they hadn't dried out and didn't look droopy.

Either way, the greenhouse is now rather full-to-bursting and I'm a bit worried the plants are getting a little crowded so I reckon, with warm weather on its way, now's probably the time to transfer them into their final pots and positions and that may help...

 

05/06/2014 at 13:37
Hi bf206, I think the plants are struggling for nutrients and they need potting up into the big pots, that's all. They should then green- up quickly.
05/06/2014 at 13:39

Cheers, Simon. Makes sense! Last year, I still had them indoors at this point as spring was so awful and they looked very sorry for themselves by comparison - but once they were in final pots/positions, as you say they picked up v well.

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