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10 messages
05/05/2014 at 17:12

Hello folks, have just noticed that my potato leaves have gone a bit black and limp in part. I'm guessing it was the frost (and not blight - although I don't know what blight looks like, anyone know?).   Do you think it'll have much effect on the crop? Will they recover? Anything I should do? thanks muchly x

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/44878.jpg?width=360&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/44879.jpg?width=360&height=350&mode=max

 

05/05/2014 at 17:15

They'll recover, but it'll set them back a bit. they could have done with being earthed up.  I'd do it now.  

Keep an eye on the weather forecasts and if there's a frost forecast and there's any greenery showing earth up some more and even pop some fleece or newspaper over. 

05/05/2014 at 17:51

Oh yes, naughty frost indeed. I found out today that my bumper crop of still-microscopic Victoria plumlets have all been blackened by it. All of them. And I had the jelly pan and jam jars polished and ready too! Chicken counting not to be done etc etc. For some reason the Marjorie's Seedling right next to the Victoria was untouched. It looks like something out of the plagues of Egypt story.

05/05/2014 at 17:54

That's the problem with having a mild winter  - plants get a bit ahead and then this happens 

05/05/2014 at 18:00

Earthing up I shall do. Thanks Dove. 

Not your plums too pansy?!  Lets hope the nobby greens don't come a cropper as well!?! At least your Marjorie's are ok.  

Is it just me, or does this sound like a Benny Hill sketch?! 

 

05/05/2014 at 19:32

Two of my young magnolias got badly damaged with all the young leaves killed - will have to wait and see if they send out new ones.  Also all of the lovely red young shoots on the kiwis have gone but they will recover (happens every year or two to them.)  A newly planted Callicarpa and a Hibiscus are looking the worse for wear with half the new growth killed.  Luckily I earthed my spuds up when I got home from work on Friday but a couple of volunteer spuds I had left in another bed went black although I was going to dig them up anyway.  Living so far inland (Leics) means frosts are that bit harder here plus I'm in a bit of a frost pocket.  Just the trials and tribulations of gardening I suppose! 

05/05/2014 at 19:41

I am pretty cross with the naughty frost too.  I went to all the trouble of covering my potatoes with  plantpots, where I couldn't physically earth up any further.  Meanwhile, last year's potato patch, now planted with broccoli and garlic, had some 'volunteers' which I was going to fish out.  I thought I would leave them as a barometer to see if we actually got frost.  Well the volunteers were okay, and obviously this year's crop under the pots were fine too.  But when I got to my firebreak border, the new leaves on my fatsia japonica were black, the hostas I had divided sat like overcooked leeks on the ground, and a red acer had 50% of leaves dying off.  The firebreak border is a bit more exposed than the potato patches, and faces east, and that obviously made all the difference, but I thought the Fatsia was hardy up to -5 degrees, and didn't really know about the others.  I think they will survive, but it was sad to see them after two weeks of doing so well

05/05/2014 at 21:31

The real harm is done by the sun on the frosty potatoe leaves. It burns them badly as can be seen in the photos. We got caught by a frost a few weeks back. In the morning I put on the covers I usually place on the spuds at night. This stopped the direct sunlight from burning the leaves.

05/05/2014 at 21:50

Sad that we all suffer from these freak frosts.  The big nursery boys just love this.  Not just with the tatties.  But all of a sudden garden centers and other outlets become full of summer bedding plants and veggies.  Talk about Lambs to the Slaughter.  Suddenly everyone is buying, and planting.  Then along comes that sudden frost.  Perhaps the most important rule of gardening is.  PATIENCE. Keep calm and wait.  There must be a moral to this post.    DOVE.... where are you??

08/05/2014 at 20:06

oh yes I had a very naughty frost that attacked my Chinese kiwi climbing vine; it survived the wettest summer ever, the coldest spring ever,we have a normal lovely spring,a very light frost and all the leaves have curled and blackened !!!

even more strange,there was a black cat on top of the trellis trying to eat the blackened leaves, he looked like he was in a trance!

looked it up on the net, and yes, cats love it have cut the blackened leaves off but shall have to put hanging baskets up to cover it

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