London (change)
Today 10°C / 5°C
Tomorrow 10°C / 10°C
1 to 20 of 39 messages
08/09/2013 at 09:37

Hi all I've recently built a raised flower bed and would like to add some colour to it with shrubs that are low maintenance.Also i'd like to add a border to the left of the garden that i can plant annual seeds but keep a bit of lawn for the kids so some ideas here would be great.

The garden gets sun all day except for the last few hours of the evening.

I'm living in Ireland.

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/30692.jpg?width=350

 

08/09/2013 at 12:50

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/30696.jpg?width=360&height=350&mode=max

 

08/09/2013 at 13:12

Hi coys looks like you've made a great start.

Do you have any preference on style, colour, form? Would you say a traditional look, cottagey or more modern? 

Give a few pointers on what you like and I am sure you will have suggestions flying at you! 

08/09/2013 at 17:12

Hi am thinking more along the cottagey feel,i would like to fill the bed on the right with a mix of colour with plants that attract bee's etc. For the bed on the left i'm open to ideas as i'm stuck as what to do.

08/09/2013 at 18:51

Welcome Coys

How about edging your raised bed with lavendar?  Maybe a summer jasmine for,the fence.   In the wide part,of your raised bed hypericum hidcote a yellow summer long flowering shrub would complement the lavendar superbly.  How wide is raised bed?

A PH test would be a wise choice to see,if your soil is acid or alkaline. ,this determines what plants you can grow there. Again, what size will bed on the left be?

08/09/2013 at 19:15

Yes was thinking about lavender as i saw a picture here http://www.johnstowngardencentre.ie/lavender-angustifolia-6-pack/lavender_hedgepd.aspx and thought it would look nice.Can i plant anything this time of year or is it best left until next year?

08/09/2013 at 19:47

Like the curvy bed,  I've got something similar. As well as the annuals are you thinking of something more permanent? Aubretia looks lovely trailing over walls and gives a lovely splash of colour

Would think it's a good time to plant perennials and biennuals now as the soil is warm

08/09/2013 at 19:57

Yes was looking for a mix of permanent and annuals and looking to add some height in there also. Sorry new to all this but is addictive.

08/09/2013 at 20:00

Hiya Coys

If you can get your plants in at least 1 litre size then yes, plant them out now.  Or get smaller ones and pot up,to keep over winter in the greenhouse or sheltered spot.  They will grow like mad next spring then.  and cheaper.  30 to 40 cm apart.

I have a lavendar edge to my veg patch....lovely.  Planted a long and curving lavendar hedge for a friend last spring and it's looked wonderful this summer.  I took cuttings to,provide plants for another hedge opposite to make an avenue of lavendar next summer.  Nothing to beat the scent of lavendar or that hazy blue of a lavendar hedge, ESP if curving.  Magnificent Coys

09/09/2013 at 06:11
Verdun wrote (see)

Hiya Coys

If you can get your plants in at least 1 litre size then yes, plant them out now.  Or get smaller ones and pot up,to keep over winter in the greenhouse or sheltered spot.  They will grow like mad next spring then.  and cheaper.  30 to 40 cm apart.

I have a lavendar edge to my veg patch....lovely.  Planted a long and curving lavendar hedge for a friend last spring and it's looked wonderful this summer.  I took cuttings to,provide plants for another hedge opposite to make an avenue of lavendar next summer.  Nothing to beat the scent of lavendar or that hazy blue of a lavendar hedge, ESP if curving.  Magnificent Coys

Thanks for the advice,i think you've sold it to me,will look out for some nice lavender.

09/09/2013 at 08:09

Looking great already! I would add a similar but smaller curving border on the other side - it will make the garden look bigger and kids do not need large expanses of lawn. If you are lucky to live in a mild part of Ireland then your options of plants are wide.

I would add Fargesia bamboo as an evergreen backbone for the back of the border and in between put tall perennials like Hollyhock, Delphinium, Eryngium etc between those (Artichoke is a member of the Sunflower family and is cheap to buy lots of 'bulbs' for and they have small yellow flowers - look out for them in shops). Smaller perennials like Rudbeckia, Primrose, Primula and bulbs like Tulips, Daffs, Crocosmia, Crocus etc all add to the cottage look and are all low maintainance. You can get all of those quite cheaply over the next few months as bare roots or bulbs.

09/09/2013 at 08:29

Don't forget penstemons, salvias, verbena bonariensis, foxgloves, scabious, geraniums, spirea and phlomis. Gaura and phlox are good too, and you can also try a small viburnum. The scent when its in flower is gorgeous, and the same goes for tree lillies. I agree with blairs that a matching border would look good.

09/09/2013 at 13:01

Coys get on the seed exchange. A lot of us have annuals to give away for the price of a stamp. 

10/09/2013 at 05:45
addict wrote (see)

Coys get on the seed exchange. A lot of us have annuals to give away for the price of a stamp. 

Great only thing is i haven't a clue on growing from seed 

10/09/2013 at 06:39
Coys wrote (see)
Great only thing is i haven't a clue on growing from seed 

Three years ago, neither did I - but you can use this site to ask what to do every step of the way - much better than books !  (Although if you want to read up on it too Carol Klein's "Grow your own garden" and the Readers Digest book of Propagating are good)

10/09/2013 at 10:04

And many are so simple to grow. All you need to know is what time of the year, scatter on the ground, cover with a little compost, water and wait!

Some plants, like aguilegias, just have to see the soil to grow lol.  

15/09/2013 at 17:22

Anyone think i can fit a tree into my garden somewhere,I want a tree 

15/09/2013 at 17:34

yes you can have one Coys. I wouldn't go for a potentially huge one. Hawthorn makes a good small tree and not worries with poisonous berries, you can eat them. But you'd have to be desperate to bother with them. 

http://apps.rhs.org.uk/AdviceSearch/Profile.aspx?pid=117

more here but there are many possibilities

15/09/2013 at 17:38

Looking at the pic of my garden where do you think one would suit? 

15/09/2013 at 17:49

I'd have it down the end away from the house where it would serve instead of the parasol on the table (eventually). But I prefer a shady sitting place, you may not

1 to 20 of 39 messages