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Hi guys, I'm a  little bit confused here and wonder if you can help, we have bought some 'prepared' hyacinth bulbs and the small glass vases to grow them in, we've not forced bulbs before and not sure if we need to keep them in the dark at low temperature for a whille til the roots form or can they go straight onto the kitchen window cill? tried searching the internet but slightly conflicting advice there so over to the GW experts.

thanks in advance 

sotongeoff

In a dark cool place for 10/12 weeks-you have it a bit late-put a bit of charcoal in the water to keep it sweet

The bulb should not be in contact with the water

Thanks for that, as I said we've not done this before, so we'll have to go with better late than never,  when is the ideal time to start them off so we know in future and what stage should they be at before we bring them into the warmth and light, sorry for all the questions but just used to planting in the garden at the recommended time and letting nature do the rest

Regards Norm

sotongeoff

Around September is best-to get them for Christmas flowering which is what a lot of people want-yours will now be later

When the shoots are around 2 inches or so you can bring them into the light.

Thankyou

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Matty2

I have mine in dark cupboard in kitchen. When the shoot at the top is about 1in showing bring it out into the light. Occassionally you


 

may have to top up the water like I need to here but not to touch the bulb with water. The shoot is just vsible but doesn't show in the photo.

It's years since I have done this, my grandparents always did and when clearing out my mothers things found this one bulb vase so am giving it a go. They used to do it with me

 

Thanks, mine have just been dispatched to a cupboard in the garage,  I just saw them in the garden centre and thought they would be interesting to try, I love the scent of hyacinths. 

Supernoodle
I think it's amazing that the bulb does not need to touch the water. The roots just know its there and grow down into it.
Bookertoo

I usually grow these to flower in February or so, when the decorations have all gone, the days are dark and wet - then fresh hyacinths with their perfume just makes me realise how good life is and that Spring really will come!

Bookertoo wrote (see)

I usually grow these to flower in February or so, when the decorations have all gone, the days are dark and wet - then fresh hyacinths with their perfume just makes me realise how good life is and that Spring really will come!

sounds great, I find that Jan  / Feb are depressing times with the joy of xmas having passed  and that much needed burst of spring colour and light still a little way off, Think I've caught the bug for this as I've planted up some narcissus bulbs labelled as suitable for forcing this evening,  some in compost and some on glass pebbles in shallow bowls no idea if it will work but enjoyed a bit of indoor gardening

nutcutlet

You need some snowdrops and some of the earliest crocusses (is that the plural of crocus?) and some aconites. Then some sarcococca and winter honeysuckle and viburnum for scent. a few coloured stem dogwoods to show when it snows and you'll never be without something to cheer you up. Winter's lovely in the garden even if the days are short.

nutcutlet wrote (see)

You need some snowdrops and some of the earliest crocusses (is that the plural of crocus?) and some aconites. Then some sarcococca and winter honeysuckle and viburnum for scent. a few coloured stem dogwoods to show when it snows and you'll never be without something to cheer you up. Winter's lovely in the garden even if the days are short.

 

cheers, a couple of those I already have and a couple are new names to me so I will look them up, what I really need is a lottery win so I can retire and stay at home to enjoy them, with work I'm out at seven and not back til five so don't get to see much of the garden til the weekends at that time of year.

nutcutlet

I can recommend retirement, age has some drawbacks but I wouldn't want to be out there in the working world again

Jammy2

As a commuting office working I'm the same as Norm2 - out at 7 and back at 7. I'm very envious of retirees

 

Indoor gardening sounds great Norm2, specially when the outside temperature is nearly freezing or it is too wet to be outside. I am trying to grow Hyacinths in glass jars too, because I found a couple under the sink, from long ago. Unfortunately mine have been on the kitchen windowsill from day one, so I am not sure if they will flower? The blue Hyacinth has a stronger root system than the white one, The perfume will be wonderful if they do manage to flower!

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hope they do bloom for you as I said at the start I wasn't sure where mine should be kept, Agree on the indoor gardening, after a night of torrential rain the lawn was too saturated for leaf sweeping today, I figured I'd do more harm than good so went and bought an amaryllis and potted that, filled a need to do something horticultural.

Dovefromabove

My last day at work will be next Nov 5th - imagine the celebrations across the nation!!!  

Lots of time for horticultural and foodie activities after that, and the theatre and music and reading books and sewing and painting and .... 

Supernoodle
Just the 33 years left for me...

Can you use any - that is - unprepared hyacinth bulbs?

nutcutlet

No, preparing them is about making them think they've had winter. a chilling. They need this before they start growing