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25/03/2013 at 17:26

Unfortunately, some over exuberant watering has killed a plant that formed the focal point of our team's desk. I am asking for any help in identifying the plant in question, any help whatsoever would be greatly appreciated. We are looking to get a replacement of the same type yet have had no success in tracking one down.

Any information would be incredible (photos attached below).


Thanks,

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/20512.jpg?width=274&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/20513.jpg?width=274&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/20514.jpg?width=274&height=350&mode=max

 

25/03/2013 at 17:33

Cyclamen

25/03/2013 at 17:35
Hopedul young gardener your plant is a well known one. Cyclamen
25/03/2013 at 17:37

Cyclamen. Water from the bottom, not the top and let the comost get dry before you re-water. 

A cyclamen will lose its leaves and look dead after flowering

25/03/2013 at 17:42
I think we are all in agreement here. ,ha ha
25/03/2013 at 17:49

And to make it easier to find one, it is Cyclamen persicum too.

25/03/2013 at 17:54

I would place the pot in a slightly larger container, so you can give it a decent amount of water each time, water it with 'Baby Bio' in the water (that is a plant food for indoor plants). When a flower dies back, cut it off. The flowering period for indoor cyclamens is almost over. You could then pot it into a slightly larger pot, give it a little water each week through the summer then in the autumn start feeding it again for the the winter flowering season. Good luck with it, I have kept these indoor plants going for 6 or more years with a bit of TLC

Whoops, have realised I didn't read all of your post; you may have a problem getting a replacement indoor cyclamen at this time of the year; you may have to wait until late summer.

25/03/2013 at 17:56

That was incredible!


Thank you so much for your response. It looks like we're going to have a number of Cyclamen persicum joining our team soon

25/03/2013 at 19:13

And here's one I made earlier! 

Not the same thing but the same Genus

And it's still flowering it's sock's off! 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/20525.jpg?width=272&height=350&mode=max

 

25/03/2013 at 21:01

That is still a Cyclamen persicum. They do come in various colours from whote to deep red and in various sizes from tiny to big and with different leaf markings. They are still persicums though.

There are other species and forms too I should add.

25/03/2013 at 21:08

Cyclamen are lovely, so delicate arent they? They grow under my wild cherry tree and I currently have two but want to get more...

26/03/2013 at 08:51

The ones under Ryan's Cherry tree wil be either C hederifolium if they flower from August onwards or C. coum if they start in January. If you want more then leave the flowers alone and let the seed pods develop. Either then collect the seeds when the pod bursts and sow immediately or let the ants takes the seeds away and plant them for you.

26/03/2013 at 09:10

Thanks for that Berghill, they're literally just starting to die back a bit now, so do the seed pods go brown? As I think I'd like to sow them for myself

26/03/2013 at 09:18

Hi Ryan, watch them, they're amazing - the stems holding the seedpods form themselves into tight corkscrews and bury the seeds in the ground themselves.  

What I do is wait until the following year and if they're growing too thickly I thin them by lifting a few little ones gently (they'll just have one leaf next spring) and move them into pots of loam-based compost and keep them in a sheltered corner for a couple of years then plant out.  

Just don't plant them deeply, the little corm should be only just below the surface, and don't let the pots get waterlogged.

26/03/2013 at 09:21

They'll be Cyclamen hederifolium if they're dying back now. Cyclamen coum are still flowering. They satrted at the new year.

26/03/2013 at 09:25

Thankyou Dove, actually getting really excited now! Normally they're quite expensive in shops, so growing my own would save loads of money Are they any good for bees and /or butterflies?

26/03/2013 at 10:11

Hi Hopeful, they are going into dormancy now and your plant is probably OK. They are very forgiving and do survive neglect. In fact, like "Peace Lilies" they soon let you know when they need watering by wilting and looking dead! But rapidly perk up when watered from below, as suggested. This should be easy to observe ,as I get the impression that the plant in question is in your work place. Anyway, good luck 

26/03/2013 at 10:16

Hi Hopeful, they are going into dormancy now and your plant is probably OK. They are very forgiving and do survive neglect. In fact, like "Peace Lilies" they soon let you know when they need watering by wilting and looking dead! But rapidly perk up when watered from below, as suggested. This should be easy to observe ,as I get the impression that

the plant in question is in your work place. Anyway, good luck 

Regarding your question Ryan, being single flowers the answer is yes but I do not know if there are any bees and butterflies active in winter, as this is when they flower generally. I could be wrong.

26/03/2013 at 11:16

Yes, hederifolium are a good source of nectar for solitary bees 

26/03/2013 at 13:05

Okay that's even better, thankyou

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