Start a new thread

1 to 11 of 11 replies

When planting roses should you leave the grafted point above soil level, or bury it beneath the soil?

Obelixx

Bury it about 2 inches/5cms below soil level.

Dovefromabove

Yes, I agree with Obelixx.

Received wisdom on this point has changed - when I was a lass Percy Thrower would tell us to ensure the graft point was above the soil.  I think this allowed a lot of wind-rock which encouraged suckering.

Far better to keep that union buried and firm the plant in well. 

Thanks for this. I wasn't sure of burying the graft encouraged suckering or the other way round. I'll plant it below soil level.

Iamweedy

ceninpedr  I have just been looking at this issue of how to plant  roses.

There seems to be totally conflicting advice on whether or not to plant the  graft above or below  the soil.  So I am now totally confused.  I expect someone will come along in a minute with the opposite view.

I wonder if it actually matters but just something gardeners like to argue about, or does it actually make any difference.

Has anyone ever done a properly conducted trial?

Advertisement

Obelixx

On GW last night, Monty said to bury the graft union.  Just in case that doesn't re-assure you, David Austin planting advice says bury it 2 inches.  I've been doing it this way for years and it works well for me.

Hostafan1

If the graft is below ground , the top stock will eventually form its own roots. This can't happen when it's above ground. 

Suckering happens when the rootstock warms up on the sun, or is damaged ( hoeing for example) This is much less likely to happen when it's buried.

Wind rock , as Dove said , doesn't happen when it's well anchored below ground. 

If someone wants to give us details of why they support the union being above ground, I'd love to hear it.

Hostafan1

I do remember MD saying ( a few years back ) to plant with the union above ground, but he's learned now.

I also remember him saying to plant bearded irises 6inches deep. hey ho.

Iamweedy

Right I will take notice. Thankyou.

I am just dressing up in my full thermals to plant my new Magnolia "Susan" In the front garden. There is no sun there at present. The roses can wait a bit longer.  There is an icy north wind blasting up our close right now.

Hostafan1

I think the trouble is advice moves on. Long term experience in real gardens over years is more valid than any "experiment"

I'd also say a lot of gardening advice is little more than " old wives' tales" which are often stated as facts.

I ended up planting the graft below ground, following advice on this forum - and so far, so good.

Sign up or log in to post a reply