London (change)
Today 9°C / 9°C
Tomorrow 11°C / 10°C
10 messages
24/05/2012 at 00:02
Hi, I was given a baby Rowan Tree last year, i put it in a pot & it's now about 6ft tall with about 8-10 leaves on it so far, I've no idea where I can put it in my garden & how to plant it properly, does anyone on here have any ideas please? Thank you
24/05/2012 at 15:45

p8ssi0n, Rowan are "Sorbus Rosaceae" and can grow quite large, if you do not have room for it the best plan is to give to some one who has. It has orange fruit which are poisonous so should be kept away from children.
It needs full sun or semi shade, fertile soil kept moist, although some will grow in dry conditions. We do have a few of them around here mainly on front gardens which in time they shade as the canopy grows, nice to look at but I would not grow one.

Frank.

24/05/2012 at 16:25

Just to clarify, rowan berries can cause mild stomach upsets if eaten raw, so children should be told not to eat them or kept away from them if they cannot be relied on not to eat them.  However, rowan berries can be cooked and make wonderful jelly and preserves.  They are a great source of food for wild birds.  They are no more poisonous than Holly berries. 

24/05/2012 at 21:30
I like rowans, but they seed very vigorously, so you have to be careful. There is a Scottish superstition that they are lucky to have in your garden, but that moving them once planted is unlucky.
25/05/2012 at 13:48

Dovefromabove, Like many fruits that would make you ill raw they can be cooked in such a way as to make edible jams or jelly.
We removed the Rowans planted by the builders because several children made themselves ill eating the raw berries, children who have seen parents picking brambles which are abundant in our area probably think all berries can be picked and eaten, we also have hazel pears, cob nuts and elderberry which are regularly picked, to kids it is one more edible thing.
Sorbus comes from many countries Korea Canada as well as Scotland, the berries can come in various colours too so be careful what you do with them.

Frank.

25/05/2012 at 14:22

I have some Rowan trees. I have them as a boundary planting to screen neighbours. They grow thin and upright for the first 10 years then start to branch out and thicken. You can plant it anywhere as long as you prune it. They take a pruning and can be kept at a reasonable height for any garden. I mixed mine with Birch. Both give a dappled screening which is pleasant all year round.

07/10/2012 at 11:43
18/07/2013 at 14:27

i have a rowan 2 yrs old and this year whilst there are some buds i have had no foliage at all it is about 6 ft tall and in a large pot - any ideas why please.

 

18/07/2013 at 14:35

It may be purely down to the adverse weather early this year marge, and now they have to cope with a heatwave! So much was very late this year. Anything in a pot might struggle more because it's totally dependant on you for everything. If there's no insect/animal damage, my first thought would be to have it somewhere with a bit of shade during the hottest part of the day and just make sure it's not short of water.  I'm assuming you renewed some of the compost in the pot in the spring but if not that would help and a mulch will help retain the moisture in the pot as well. I'd do that first and give it another month to see how it is. 

18/07/2013 at 15:10

They are very astringent, I'm surprised any child would eat enough to make them ill.

Parents really should take responsibility for teaching children not to eat anything in the garden without permission or adult supervision.

I really don't think a pot is the right place for a rowan.  Why don't you ask the council if you can plant it in a park?

email image
10 messages