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13 messages
30/04/2013 at 11:03

Hello

I planted lots of tulips and daffodil’s last year, and they have come up and now I have some questions.

1. What should you do when the flowers die?  (do they need digging up etc)

2. Is there any way of preventing daffodils flowers collapsing on their own weight...some of the flowers fall after they get big.

Regards

 D

30/04/2013 at 11:50

Remove the dead flowers and their stems and put them in the compost.  Feed the bulbs with something like blood, fish and bone or pelleted chicken manure so they can fatten up for next year's show and then either leave the foliage for at least 6 weeks before cutting it off or else let the leaves die down naturally whilst other plants appear around them to disguise the fading leaves - assuming you have them in a mixed border with perennials.  If not, just plant small annuals and perennials in amongst them to grow up and continue the flowering succession through the summer.

The larger flowered tulip hybrids don't always coem again but will if they were planted deep enough.   The smaller species tulips usually flower year after year if the conditions are right for them.

05/05/2013 at 17:16

That's great many thanks

16/05/2013 at 22:28

Thanks also as was searching forvthis question too. As i am new to gardening please excuse the dumb question...Why do we leave the leaves for 6 weeks?

16/05/2013 at 22:54

Hi Nick, the leaves will feed the bulb ready for next years flowers.  Bulb flowers are produced almost entirely from the stored goodness in the bulb, so if you cut the leaves off straight after flowering, there will be no flower the next year.

17/05/2013 at 07:20

Thank you Bob. That makes perfect sense. Much appreciated. Nick

17/05/2013 at 08:12

Hi I am  new to gardening as well. My Tulips bulb were bought from DIY store and had a very big flowers and they are not the normal tulip you see in fields of Holland. I planted them in a pot. the flowers are now died do i need to feed the plant and follow as per above to feed them. and at what point shall i dig it out of the pot for storage for next year..

Many thanks

17/05/2013 at 10:41

Yes, feed now and wait until the leaves have died down, then dry and clean the bulbs and store cool and dark over Summer for replanting in Autumn.

20/05/2013 at 07:13

I had found this link http://financialinteractive.com/world/12-things-you-can-do-with-old-flowers, I also wants to know how to decompose dead flowers,that's why I search for this.

20/05/2013 at 08:01

I used to tie leaves and stem in a sort of knot above the bulb and when they died they were easy to collect up and were not flopping all over the ground. However I realise this might be a bit over obsessive!  It worked for me though and kept the garden tidy.

10/04/2014 at 18:38

Yes but they make the Garden look untidy for six weeks when you need to nurture the next flowers,by this time the wallflowers are allmost finished too.

11/04/2014 at 16:28
L Plate Gardener wrote (see)

I used to tie leaves and stem in a sort of knot above the bulb and when they died they were easy to collect up and were not flopping all over the ground. However I realise this might be a bit over obsessive!  It worked for me though and kept the garden tidy.

I also used to do this many years ago, but tieing knots into the leaves apparently prevent the leaves feeding the bulb (which is the whole point of leaving the leaves on in the first place).

I got round the problem of floppy daffs by planting Tete a Tete which are very long lasting, and have leaves which don't look too untidy, as they are only about 9" tall.

So now I just dead head them, leave the leaves for 8 weeks or so and feed them.

14/04/2014 at 16:01

Thanks for this info as i wondered the same too. Someone also told me not to tie the leaves as you said.

So they really daffs and other bulbs need to be fed now, what about cyclamen plants, would they be the same? 

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