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Hello

This is my first thread so hear goes;

I want to start by planting a screening hedge 5-6ft high along the the boundary fence,Looking at the sewer and water pipes on a authority map it shows a sewer pipe also runs along the boundary line.I have looked at Red Robin and Hornbream but have become totally confussed what my options are.Can anyone suggest a shrub or hedge that will not affect the sewer pipe and is fast growing.

 X

Any idea how deep it is Tarzan?  Not known of anyone have problems planting anything on boundaries, must be pipes all over the place....

Looking down the man hole cover the clay sewer pipe runs directly along the boundary into the road at about 4ft - 5ft deep.The pipe is about 6 inches wide and i am worried about the roots breaking into the pipe and causeing a blockage and damage to the pipework,

Have you considered boxwood shrubs?

A Green Velvet Boxwood grows about 4-6 feet upon maturity and also fast growing. Best for growing zones 5-8. Since the mature width is 3-5 feet, I don't think the roots can reach and damage the pipes. But i'm not sure though. It's just my guess. I never heard anyone having problems with pipes when it comes to shrubs. 

http://www.fast-growing-trees.com/Green-Velvet-Boxwood.htm

 

 

Thanks Blissful gardener will have a look at your link thanks again

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 X

I think you'd be fine Tarzan, it's not like you are planting trees that will get huge with age and have massive root systems.

Fairygirl

Tarzan- just make sure you're buying from a British nursery for your hedging...

some of these posts are advertising- and not from this country.

You shouldn't have any problem with pipes with any hedging you pick. As Paula says- it's really only an issue with mature trees. Hopes Grove Nursery are a good hedge supplier. I've used them in the past and I've just ordered some bare root hedging from them for this winter. Just google the name and you'll find them easily. 

Thanks everyone for your responses.Thanks again

Have you considered beech?  Retains it's dead leaves through the winter so adds more interest than an evergreen.  Or a native mix - beech, hawthorn, hazel etc

As others have said, as the hedging is going to be restricted in height, you don't have same concerns with depth as you would with planting trees. 

Thanks MamboMouse.

Dovefromabove

I love a holly hedge - and good for wildlife too 

Ah yes, but a holly hedge is no good if next to a lawn - those leaves take forever to break down & think of the prickles on bare feet - ouch!  

Atilla
Blissful Gardener wrote (see)

Have you considered boxwood shrubs?

A Green Velvet Boxwood grows about 4-6 feet upon maturity and also fast growing. Best for growing zones 5-8. Since the mature width is 3-5 feet, I don't think the roots can reach and damage the pipes. But i'm not sure though. It's just my guess. I never heard anyone having problems with pipes when it comes to shrubs. 

http://www.fast-growing-trees.com/Green-Velvet-Boxwood.htm

 

Buxus is not fast growing - you can be dead before it gets to 6ft as that takes 20-50 years depending on position. It is also expensive - over £1 per 9cm plant. A bare root wip is about 60p for a native hedge tree that will reach 4-6ft in 3 years. Also the Zones system form the USA are of no use in the UK as out temperatures are milder in winter but much much wetter - it can be bone dry in a US winter and winter is longer here than in the US as we are far more northern.

nutcutlet

The rooted box cuttings I planted 18-20 years ago have almost reached 6' where not clipped. In that time hawthorn,spindle, laurel, hazel and many others are twice or three times that height. 

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Topbird

I have inherited a hedge of Prunus Lusitania (aka Portugese Laurel) which I really like because

  • it's evergreen & dense & abt 2m high
  • it seems to grow quite quickly but...
  • I only have to cut it once a year in summer
  • it has retained a nice shape
  • the foliage is good for cutting (flower arrangements & Xmas decs)
  • it's not prickly!

Whatever you plant, soil preparation and watering will be the key to success. 

I have found Red Robin can be leggy and also split, so I would be wary of using it where you need screening. Also be wary of choosing something just because it is fast growing - it will continue to be so & you'll be forever cutting it.

I have also not heard of deep pipes being affected by shrubs. The real culprits are thirsty water seekers such as willow (so dont be tempted by a "fedge"!).

Good luck.

 

 

 

 

Hi I'm with nutcutlet, I planted a hornbeam hedge mixed with hawthorn and it's lovely, the birds get in there too and have had blackbirds nesting even though it runs alongside a pavement. Advantages of hornbeam and hawthorn is that they're not fussy about soil and can grow well in most types of conditions.

The hornbeam is just like beech but faster, creates the same effect, leaves stay on in winter if hedge is clipped. I got mine from Buckingham nurseries too, they're very good. Although a lot of nurseries are now supply various saplings for hedges.

Good luck

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