London (change)
Today 13°C / 8°C
Tomorrow 10°C / 5°C
15 messages
10/09/2012 at 22:27

...I just wanted to know if this is normal?

It's very healthy, had a great flush of new, fresh green leaves in the Spring and has gained a lot in size this year.

Planted n May 2011, ordinary soil, mainly compost and a little original heavier clay soil, in raised bed with an acer, a rose and some herbaceous perennials.

Not so much as a sign of a flower.

Am I doing something wrong or is it just time and maybe not so much rain as this year?

10/09/2012 at 22:30

How big is it? The plant sounds as though it is settling in well and putting on growth...it may not be big or established enough for flowering just yet - hopefully next year. 

10/09/2012 at 22:33

Hi Daintiness - thanks

It's about 80cm tall I think and almost as wide- beautiful plant.

I intend to leave it in peace and see what happens next year, but was also wondering if i ought to be cutting it back a bit or not? Would that encourage it to flower at all?

10/09/2012 at 22:48
It's just very happy. It's growing well, doing what's easy for it. No need for it to flower. I think you have given it comfy conditions. I wouldn't feed it....Certainly not cut it back. However, I think it will flower next spring but leave it be for a bit. If it does flower you can trim it back a bit if you want it to remain compact.
10/09/2012 at 22:51

thanks Christopher - great advice

11/09/2012 at 07:40

Can I make a plea for you not to cut it back unless you absolutely have to?  

I have found that choisyas respond to the knife by putting on huge amounts of growth (which defeats the usual object of cutting them back) and in my experience they almost invariably do not flower as well as previously following hard pruning.

Just a light trim after flowering should be enough.  

http://apps.rhs.org.uk/advicesearch/Profile.aspx?PID=168

 

11/09/2012 at 08:25
I grow different varieties of choisya and trim back every year. If I didn't do,this I would have big rambling leggy plants. Mine flower profusely and look good as mounded evergreen bushes when not in flower. A regular light trim after flowering discourages new growth from low down so I look out for the odd old stem to remove completely,or cut at a lower point. Choisyas are lovely as topiary-type plants with their rich green shiny leaves and, when pruned, and tight shape. They then never outgrow their space
11/09/2012 at 11:03

Talking about pruning........do hydrangeas do the same? I pruned two of them two years ago and did not expect them to flower last year, but they have not done so this year either. They are looking very robust and healthy too.I just hope it is just an extra looooong sulk and buckup next year! Anyone have a similar problem?

11/09/2012 at 15:35
Pruning hydrangeas too far back just makes for loads of growth and no flowers. Usually, you prune back below,the dead flower head from last year to the newly emerging fat buds below. I also remove one or two old stems to ground level. Jatnikapyar, I think you should leave the pruning for a while - you may,have flowers next spring.
11/09/2012 at 16:32

Thanks Dove - shall do!

13/09/2012 at 11:17

Thanks Christopher, you are a star!

13/09/2012 at 20:13

I have the same soil as you and mine is just a lush of leaves.I think because I cut it back  as a bush that in fact I am clipping off the flowering shoots.thats what someone told me.

14/08/2013 at 20:37

Can anyone help me please, I planted two mexican orange blossom plants in March this year, one is thriving but the other has shrivelled up. I can't let it go as it was panted in my garden for my Mums memorial, it so upsetting to see one not doing well, neither has flowered either, PLEASE HELP!!

Thanks Coral.

14/08/2013 at 22:48

My choisya seems to have been damaged by the intense sun and heat this year, is it ok to prune back the damaged foliage?

14/08/2013 at 23:53

Momymum, is,your,shrivelling up choisya the yellow one, called sundance?  This doesn't really like it in too much direct sun.  Is it very dry there?  Do you water it?  

since you planted it in march it will easily move so that's an option for you.  Choisyas are happy in dry soils as lomg as they are watered well during their first season.  Can you tell us a little more about the situation your sickly choisya is in?

Yes, Joanne, you can cut choisyas back and remove damaged foliage.  Cut back to nice healthy buds or shoots.

email image
15 messages