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15 messages
12/06/2014 at 20:31

Hi we have a large peach tree in our garden, it is about 3 metres tall and quite wide so very difficult to cover properly. The tree has severe peach curl and the peaches which were doing quite well have withered. The tree is almost completely defoliated. Is there anything we can do to save it now and prevent the disease from returning. We try to garden organically so are reluctant to spray, hence the severity of the problem. Any help would be very welcome thanks

12/06/2014 at 21:01

Try this link to the RHS for treatment and prevention of subsequent infections. There is nothing you can do this year only take precautions for next year with spraying and building the shelter in the link below.

http://www.rhs.org.uk/Advice/profile?pid=232

12/06/2014 at 21:05

More often than not.  Leaf-curl is caused by a very tiny bug.  It attaches a sticky thread, similar to the line of a spider's web.  It then draws the tread tighter and at the same time, adding more strands.  Often the leaves will in time fall.  Hey ho.  Tiny bug is as snug as.  It now has a protective winter home.

I'll leave it to you to.  Name that bug!

13/06/2014 at 00:42

Peach lead curl is caused by a fungus........however, if you can keep rain off in spring and early summer you will avoid it.  Easy for a small bush or a fan trained one where a cover can be attached to fhe wall/fence at this time.  Ideally grow in a greenhouse.  

Susie, a 3 metre tree will be difficult to protect.  

I grow 2 varieties in pots ....currently in GH and free from peach leaf curl now.  I think they will now be safe to put outside 

I will read Dave's link posted above myself 

13/06/2014 at 07:32
Hi Susie, as per all of the above, the only way i have managed to salvage my tree was to reduce its size and build the most bizzare looking shelter from the remains of old grow houses- it doesnt look great, but its working a treat! Is there any way you could cut it back?
13/06/2014 at 07:46

Morning Rebecca

Yes, that's the way to do it......sounds ideal 

Keeping tree pruned from the start, to encourage fruiting spurs and controlling growth makes it easier to protect from,peach leaf curl.  

13/06/2014 at 09:11

Thanks to all who replied to my post. I will read Daves' link definitely but thankyou Rebecca and Verdun, cutting it back and trying to keep it small enough to cover is probably the only answer. I would like to try Verduns' idea and grow one in a pot on our patio, could I take cuttings from my tree or would the new cuttings be infected as well? The greenhouse idea is also very interesting as we live on a wet and windy marsh.

13/06/2014 at 16:20

Thanks Mike for your info about my peach tree. I think I will give up with the big one in the garden and plant another on the patio.If I plant it with a barrow load of your positivity it will have no choice but to blossom and fruit. Good luck and keep smiling.

13/06/2014 at 19:20

Susie, I grow a resistant variety called "Avalon Pride" on "Mont Clare" rootstock in a large container (1m x 1m) and although it isn't totally free of Peach Leaf Curl, it is easy to control by picking-off the few leaves which are affected.  Full size peaches and easy to keep to 2m high.  There are now other resistant varieties and those are listed on the RHS advice page, but I can only personally recommend Avalon Pride.

http://www.rhs.org.uk/Advice/profile?pid=232

 

13/06/2014 at 19:32

Thanks very much Bob. I will look for that variety and try planting it in a large tub. This is the way we thought we would have to go.Thanks for the link. Is this variety easy to find  or do you have to use specialist companies. 

13/06/2014 at 19:38

Most nurseries selling fruit trees will have it.  Plenty also online if you google. 

13/06/2014 at 19:41

Thanks again Bob, going shopping tomorrow then!

13/06/2014 at 20:33

Hiya  Bob, 

So Avalon Pride tolerates peach l curl for you?  Must check it out.  

13/06/2014 at 23:18

Hi Verdun, Yes and it has lovely red flowers too.  I grow it in my East-midlands south-facing front garden, which is a bit of a sun-trap, so it should do exceptionally well down in Cornwall.

14/06/2014 at 00:19

That clinches it then.  Thanks Bob  

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