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18 messages
18/01/2014 at 18:56

I am trying to recover an area of my garden to use for vegetables. It's about 50m2, and the previous owner covered it in poppies, which flower late in the spring and seem to dwarf over anything we plant and grow ferociously, sapping the life out of anything I plant. The bed was treated with roundup, and visible roots were lifted last year, but many still survived.

As I prepare the beds to try again this year - what can I do to try and rid them of the perennials? 

18/01/2014 at 19:02

What sort of poppies are they Jon? 

 

18/01/2014 at 19:35
I'm not sure. I think they could be Papaver orientale. They are particularly tall and bloom late. Still in July.
18/01/2014 at 20:03

I'm happy to be wrong but they look very similar to the poppies which grow in my garden, I read somewhere, the seeds can lay dormant in the soil for 10yrs or more, waiting for the right conditions to grow again and I can believe that. 

Don't want to be the bringer of bad news but if they are the one's in my garden I've been trying to get rid for over 20yrs. If you let the flowers go to seed they explode everywhere.

On a more positive note they reproduce by self seeding, so as long as you don't let the flowers go to seed eventually the numbers will reduce and emerging seedlings can either be hoed into your soil on the veg beds or pulled out. 

 

18/01/2014 at 20:08

is there any way you could clear the plot, bit by bit and burn the seeds by using a flame thrower or something similar? Seems the quickest way to get rid.

18/01/2014 at 20:17

I should have thought a good dose of glyphosate applied to full leaves before the flowers start would knock them back 

Have I missed a photo? Zoomer says they look similar to his/hers

18/01/2014 at 20:32

Thanks - don't think I'd trust myself with a flame thrower

I was thinking of getting a rotavator, turing it over a good 12" after having pulled up as many roots again and glycophosphate the blighters. There wasn't a photo - guess you can find one on google.

18/01/2014 at 20:44

If you're sure they're oriental poppies don't rotavate, oriental poppies grow from root cuttings, you'll be creating lots of root cuttings.

A flame thrower won't help, the roots are underground.

Zoomer's seed problems sound more like an annual poppy

18/01/2014 at 20:50

Sorry for causing a panic, you will still have a good veg bed...where stuff grows  but treat them like an annual weed and hoe regularly, the seedlings aren't deep rooting and if they appear elsewhere in the garden just pull them up.  

18/01/2014 at 20:51

Thanks nutcutlet - I hadn't thought about the root cuttings - that would have been a nightmare!

18/01/2014 at 20:55

If they're so well established you'll probably need more than one go with the glyphosate. Try and get them in full leaf before the flowers buds come

18/01/2014 at 20:59

Sorry for causing a panic, you will still have a good veg bed...where stuff grows..  but treat them like an annual weed and hoe regularly, the seedlings aren't deep rooting and if they appear elsewhere in the garden just pull them up.

Mine don't grow from the root so a rotavator isn't necessary. Established one's may have a long deep root but they die if pulled.   

18/01/2014 at 21:17

thanks Zoomer. We'll give it a go. We might dump some raised beds on top of them as a trial

18/01/2014 at 21:48

Looks like nutculet and I were posting at the same time, nutculet does know flowers 

18/01/2014 at 21:56

Thank you Zoomer.

Not sure if the raised beds will help though. What do you think? If the poppies are annuals the seeds will be everywhere and if they're perennials they'll come through.

18/01/2014 at 22:07

If they are anuals treat them as weeds

19/01/2014 at 11:34

Annual poppies should just hoe off.  Oriental poppies will have thick tap roots and start emerging soon. I would glyphosate them if so. Rotovating just propagates by root cuttings.

19/01/2014 at 15:00

It all depends on which poppy you have, as written above. I have red and purple poppies on my allotment. The reds are thugs and are easily pulled up. The purple ones are pretty and small. So I leave a few of both to attract insects to the plot, but pull them up as soon as the flowers become seed pods 

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