London (change)
Today 15°C / 8°C
Tomorrow 17°C / 7°C
13 messages
24/04/2012 at 08:02

Hi, I'm a small business based in Devon. I run a rainwater harvesting business called Rainwater Conservation Ltd. I'm not leaving a thread to promote sales i'm infact letting people who have a interest in looking for better solutions to store rainwater for re-use. I'm here to listen to suggestions and answer questions people may have and offer solutions to storing water to feed your gardens. If anyone would like to please do ask.

thank you

jon corke

24/04/2012 at 09:27

Jon

Thanks for the offer but I'm doing fine with my rainwater storage. I have four 55 gallon plastic drums and a 220 gallon IBC giving me 433 gallons in total. The IBC was used to store fruit juice so no problems with contamination there. They come in a steel mesh cage but when I went collect it, it was about an inch too wide to fit into the back of our small Suzuki van so we had to undo the cage and just bring the 'bladder' back. When full with rainwater, as it now is, it distorts badly. Also being stored on a pair of wooden pallets, the weight is enormous. I therefore plan to get another IBC (eBay have many) complete with cage and create a better base for it. I've read posts where some people feel its a waste of time collecting as it soon runs out in hot weather. Well the solution is to do as I did and get more. The drums I got either free or for £10 off eBay. As for being an eyesore, as some think, the drums are dark green and the IBC is tucked away behind the workshop. I hope this helps someone.

27/04/2012 at 19:58

Thats fine, nearly 2000l of water. I'm a professional and its the difference ' between fixing a fence with bailer twine or wire' if you understand my point. Yes you can do a B & q job or for gardeners who would prefere to exploit technology and impliment different ideas thats why i specialise in this industry. I can add factors to your system such as filters and a pump and you no longer have to struggle behind your shed to fill your watering can after frequent emptying.

27/04/2012 at 20:49

So if you aren't trying to promote your business for free, why not remove the company name from the thread?

27/04/2012 at 20:53

 Spam.

If you aren't trying to promote your business for free, why not remove the company name from the thread?

28/04/2012 at 10:05

Because i'm trying to promote rainwater conservation/harvesting and without telling people about my self and what i do i could be anyone. At least by including my company name if people wanted to validate my professional status they can. As i said i actually thought people would have a genuine interest from someone who had experience in eco saving advice for their gardens. i'm sorry you feel my presence is spam i'm sure alan titchmarsh thought the same when he fitted a rainwater harvesting system rather than just a water butt. As i said before i was hoping i would be able to hear what genuine gardeners wanted in their gardens,

28/04/2012 at 10:57

I'm very happy with the way I do things at the mo - I have 12 waterbutts all collecting rainwater. I have no electricity, so a pump is out the question. Solar wouldn't work, we get no sun. Wind, nahhhh - the metal would get nicked.

Good old fashioned, dip the watering can into the barrel, does fine for me. To be honest, I believe that collecting rainwater will become a thing of the past, as the seasons become dryer and dryer.

I do have one question - what are the alternatives available to me, when it does not rain ???

Cheers

28/04/2012 at 11:14

"To be honest, I believe that collecting rainwater will become a thing of the past, as the seasons become dryer and dryer".

Sorry Marshmello but that doesn't make sense. As the seasons become dryer and dryer, collecting rainwater will become even more important. I am happy with my water butts and IBC (although I have to re-think the way it's placed) and their simple taps. But presumably some gardeners want something either more elaborate or to have the rainwater pumped into the house to top up the toilet cisterns and so on. My own experience from when I used to care for up to twenty four gardens was that people don't give a jot, either for water butts or compost bins. Almost none of my customers wanted either, inspite of my encouragement, because of perceived costs or the unattractiveness of either. Its a shame because they'll all be bleating when the hosepipe bans come in, if they aren't already. My own hosepipe almost never gets used and it's sole purpose is to very occasionally top up the pond.

28/04/2012 at 11:52

"To be honest, I believe that collecting rainwater will become a thing of the past, as the seasons become dryer and dryer" - I stand by this comment !!

I live in the northeast of england and for the past year and more, we have had very little rain, so with no rain how can I fill waterbutts ? - Kinda useless bits of moulded plastic really - unless filled with rain.

During a long hot spell of weather, I can use at least 1 waterbutt plus, a day. I estimate that I have at least 10days worth of water for the garden - what do I do for the other 20days should it not rain during one month? Cloudbusting !!

I do not collect rainwater as a token gesture, I seriously collect rainwater. If it wasn't for this extreme rainfall of late, my barrels would dry!!!!!

28/04/2012 at 12:48

Marshmello

Too many exclamation marks I'm afraid. Here in the South East, except for a few weeks a year, my waterbutts always have a certain amount stored. For the last fortnight, they've been overflowing. I use the rainwater for both the greenhouse and anything in pots or containers (tomatoes) and never anywhere else in the garden unless a plant is clearly distressed. I aim this year to add yet more water butts too. The more the merrier.

28/04/2012 at 15:48

i recently installed a underground tank for a syndicate of people who wanted to make the rainwater harvesting system affordable. true if no rain no storage but the mains back up only puts around six inches of water in the tank and normally covers the gap between rainfalls. With respect to the dryer climate abroad where they have little rain its a legal requirement to have a rain water harvesting system installed and for the sake of spreading the cost between friend/neighbours you can store easily ten tons of water to use which will almost certainly never run out

28/04/2012 at 15:53

I agree with Paul N as he clearly comes from an experienced back round. He has answered the reason why i thought fit to get involved with a forum such as this as the general public don't understands the benifits of re- using water. I also install grey water systems that feed gardens with used bath water , the options avaliable are actually very simple and can save a huge amount of mains water. I have 1/4 acre garden and the amount times i use the mains water is very small. I'm only thirty and i'm allready addressing problems before they arise. hence rainwater harvesting.

28/04/2012 at 17:41

Once this monsoon of rain has gone, and the barrels have dryed up. I shall have to start rain-dancing on top of the compost holders, in the hope it evokes more rain. Maybe the sacrificing of a few lettuce hearts in a sandwich might ,also, do the trick.

email image
13 messages