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My Red Robin looks healthy enough but several leaves have black patches on them. I first noticed it in the late summer/autumn of last year. What is the black patch thing, and is there anything I can do about it?

Not sure.  Photinias all seem to have spots on them from time to time and regularly lose a lot of leaves, in my experience.  

I lost one red robin to phytopthora.....a separate comdition I'm sure.  I have another that has black, brown spots ESP during the winter.  In spring the new growth however transforms the bush.  So I wouldn't worry too much if your plant generally looks healthy.

Early summer I prune lightly to encourage a further flush of red leaves and this tends to remove most of the tatty old leaves

Many thanks for your help.  Ok it seems that I shouldn't be too concerned.

I am not an experienced gardener, so I appreciate the tips you've given me, particularly the time to prune as that would have been my next question for the forum!! Should I prune once per year only, early summer?

 

 

I prune after the new red leaves have turned green....so early summer....but have also  repeated this in mid summer by very lightly snipping back again in the,hope of more red leaves.  

OK, I'll do that.
Many thanks.

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Lion S

The black patches in Photinia leaves are caused by Entomosporium maculatum, a fungal leaf spot disease. It's is very common and is not harmful to the shrub. The main reason of these spots occurring, is the leaves remaining wet over a long period. It doesnt look very nice though.

Plants in a sheltered spot are more prone to leaf spots, as well as new foliage. Pruning during the growing season will encourage new growth. Mature leaves are more resistant to leaf spot.

  • Rake up and discard fallen leaves, and remove infected plant material. Apply fresh mulch around plants to cover any leaves that were missed. You could also try underplanting with low growing perennials, such as catmint. 
  • Provide sufficient air circulation. This often means thinning out a few plants in a hedge.
  • Avoid wetting the leaves when watering. Splashing water spreads the fungus.
  • Avoid summer fertilization that will promote new growth late in the season.

 If nothing seems to work, you can try spraying with a fungicide just before and during new foliage is emerging. If that doesn't make any difference, I would be inclined to remove Red Robin althogether.

I hope this will help.  

 

 

My red robin leaves appear to be turning black, and going crumbly on the ends as if they have been burnt, 

can anyone offer any advice ???

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