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7 messages
30/06/2013 at 22:52

hi all. i planted a fuschia, which i had overwintered in a shed. when i emptied out the plant and inspected the soil, their were clusters of small, white, round jelly consistency globules, which i think maybe snails eggs.  I removed them, but im not sure if they are friend or foe. Does anyone have any advice please? 

30/06/2013 at 22:56

Did you pop them? Chances are they are the granulated  fertilizer capsules from the compost and not eggs. Usually by popping one you will find they are dry and empty. Nothing to worry about.

30/06/2013 at 23:03

Hi Maureen - I just looked up snail eggs on the internet, cos I realised I didn't know what they looked like - which is pretty much as you describe.  Apparently you can eat them instead of caviar, which is a fact I was happier not knowing!  There seems to be a lot of variation in the eggs according to species (I don't know how to download a link, but it was easy to find).  Warning though, there are some horrid videos of slugs laying eggs as well!

30/06/2013 at 23:10

hi daintiness and Sara 4, that was quick.

yes I popped them, they were gelatinous and squidgy.

30/06/2013 at 23:11

If they were spread through the compost they are probably the slow release fertiliser granules. If they are in a cluster as you describe, they are probably snail or slug eggs.

Dispose of by feeding to the fishes if you have a pond.

 If not, grind them underfoot on a hard surface.

01/07/2013 at 06:53

Did they look like this?  I found these yesterday when I was planting out a pink for the side border out front:

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/26546.jpg?width=323&height=485&mode=max

Ugh.  I assume they were slug/snail eggs and was going to start a new thread until I spotted this one. Can anyone confirm I've foiled the slugs' dastardly plot to conquer my garden?

 

01/07/2013 at 16:45

Put them out in the garden in a clear place and Mr Robin will be very happy with them for his tea!  My home robin watches carefully when I tidy the gravel and top layer of compost in the hosta pots, in the hope there will be slug eggs in there.  Not so many these days since the use of copper tape, but what there are he loves. 

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