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7 messages
30/10/2012 at 20:17

Ive covered my veg beds on allotment this year for over wintering.I have been given all sorts of different opinions, but my mind is completely muddled now. Im still quite new to this allotmenteering and learning all the time,some have told me covering will stop the nutrients from being washed out of the soil others have said the covering will stop the frost from breaking it upand thus producing a finer tilth come spring.Any advice/comments would be most helpful.cheers

30/10/2012 at 20:20

I'm no veg expert but I should think letting the weather get at the soil through the winter would be good then cover it (black plastic?) a couple of weeks before you want to start sowing to warm it up

30/10/2012 at 20:23

Seconded.

 

30/10/2012 at 20:39

Oh dear ill try an experiment will remove cover from 3 and let the others shiver through winter then come spring see what difference there is . Thanks for ur quick respones

07/11/2012 at 15:50

Does leving he leaves on the ground under Trees help the bluebells awaiting below and how about leaves on grass remove or leave

07/11/2012 at 15:54
Terence Yates wrote (see)

Does leving he leaves on the ground under Trees help the bluebells awaiting below and how about leaves on grass remove or leave


You should remove leaves from grass.

I wouldn't say that leaving leaves under trees "helps" the the bluebells-although that is obviously what happens in the wild-depends on how tidy you want to be

07/11/2012 at 16:05

I thought the frost only broke the soil up if you rough dig it. I have stopped digging my veg garden because of the underlying clay. In the autumn I leave about 3 big piles of manure on it and the rest I cover with permeable weed preventive fabric.In the spring I remove the fabric, chuck the manure all over it and dig some into the runner bean place, then I rotovate it. Then a few days later I rake and planting starts. Seems to work. Of course there are some places with leeks and winter brassicas that are left through winter.

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