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6 messages
06/10/2013 at 10:31

I have a mophead hydrangea in a tub as my garden soil is sandy.  For the past 2 years it has failed to flower. Can anyone give me some advice please?

06/10/2013 at 10:36

Habe you pruned it? I ask only in that they flower next year on wood produced this year. So it is easy to prune off the flower buds. Here they never flowered as the flowering stems were always  destroyed by the wind in April.

Otherwise it is down to food and water.

06/10/2013 at 10:40

I pruned it a couple of years ago but have not fed it. Is it too late now to start feeding? 

06/10/2013 at 11:52

You could try giving it a liqid feed of rose or tomato food as these are high potash and will encourage flowers.  Mophead hydrangeas flower on the previous season's growth so this may help with flower formation for next year. 

Other than that; mophead hudrangeas need moisture so give it plenty of mulch of good garden compost and/or well rotted manure to help retain moisture and provide extra nutrients because sandy soil is fast draining and usually low in nutrients.   Do this now, after a good rain fall when the soil is moist and again in mid winter when the ground is not frozen and next spring and every autumn thereafter.

You may be better trying the paniculata forms as they flower on new season's wood and need less moisture but still plenty of nutrients.

06/10/2013 at 11:55

You could try giving it a liqid feed of rose or tomato food as these are high potash and will encourage flowers.  Mophead hydrangeas flower on the previous season's growth so this may help with flower formation for next year. 

Other than that, mophead hydrangeas need moisture so never let its compost dry out and give it a mulch of good garden compost and/or well rotted manure to help retain moisture and provide extra nutrients.   You may need to remove the top couple of incjes of compost to accommodate it.   Do this now, after a good watering and again next spring and every spring thereafter.

You may be better trying the paniculata forms as they flower on new season's wood and need less moisture but still plenty of nutrients.

06/10/2013 at 12:09

Sorry about the double reply but I couldn't edit the first one after I realised you had it in a pot so the answer had to be different.

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