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04/06/2014 at 22:29

Hi,

I've finally managed to take a cutting of a favourite climbing rose. I rooted it in water over winter and it rooted around February. I then transferred it to a pot of compost where it continued to root and grow. It has always been kept in the conservatory. 

My question is do I need to prune it at all at this stage? It's growing quite prolifically and I'm worried about whether the roots can support all the growth. This week it also put out straight climbing shoots which are going to flower! Should I allow it to flower already? I'm quite amazed at how it's grown. I read that you plant out rose cuttings the following year so I was planning on leaving it in its pot till next spring, but at this rate of growth I'm not sure what to do. It's a climber so not sure if it's going to keep climbing more (it has no support in the pot!). Picture below!

Any help would be greatly appreciated. I'm lost!

Thanks

Kris

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/48204.jpg?width=544&height=350&mode=max

 

 

 

 

04/06/2014 at 22:32

I'm too new to offer advice, but I'm subscribing to this as I intend to take cuttings this winter too. I'm so impressed at your growth!

I do know there's a new thread to ask all your rose related questions to.

Happy gardening

04/06/2014 at 22:36

..well done...it looks really good... if you are certain the plant has a good root system in the pot...i.e. you should be able to see little white roots coming out of the bottom or just poking through...then you should plant it... no need to trim....just get it in the ground while there's plenty of moisture around...

04/06/2014 at 22:37

Wow!  That looks brill!

04/06/2014 at 22:39

You need to get it out of that conservatory asap.

04/06/2014 at 22:48
Salino wrote (see)

..well done...it looks really good... if you are certain the plant has a good root system in the pot...i.e. you should be able to see little white roots coming out of the bottom or just poking through...then you should plant it... no need to trim....just get it in the ground while there's plenty of moisture around...

Thanks for your replies. The roots are not yet poking through the bottom of the pot (which is quite deep as it's a commercial rose pot). Before this pot it was in a transparent bottle of compost as i wanted to monitor root growth, they were quite good which is why I then moved it to its current pot. How much longer should I wait for roots to show? If they don't show before the heat kicks in, should I keep it in its pot till next Spring? If so, should I prune it? Feed it? Allow it to flower? It already has two flower buds (very small). I'm also unsure of how much to water it. 

Thanks for your guidance.

Kris

04/06/2014 at 23:06

...then I would wait until I saw those roots showing through the bottom of the pot...I would anticipate that should be before the end of summer, in which case you would plant it out just like any container bought rose... by Autumn at the very latest I would think, and that's a good time to plant in any case.... certainly no need to wait till Spring...just keep watered...no need to prune...if it flowers...enjoy them...

..some soluble feed in the watering can would be nice every couple of weeks or so...

just a word of warning...some roses grown on their own roots are not as vigorous as those which are grafted...no way of telling with yours until it's been in the ground for a while... but there is a chance it won't grow as big as you might expect or be as floriferous.... with other roses some are better for own root.... just have to wait and see.... do you know the name of it...?   just curious...

04/06/2014 at 23:09

Well done.  Yes it really does look healthy.  Regardin pruning, and planting out.  I notice it is making rapid top growth.  Much depends on the type of rose this cutting is from.  In any case.  I would be inclined to severely shorten those long shoots.   What you need to encourage is, as much growth from as low as possible, so as to give the plant a good strong base.  It will be beneficial to place the pot outside.  Personally I would be a bit reluctant to actually planting it out.  Take a look at the drainage holes of the pot.  A good indicator asto the root formation.  All the time the plant is in the pot.  The roots will become stronger, and the basal shoots will become more mature.  There is a difference here between a container purchased rose from the garden center, and your cutting.  The former already has a well developed root stock, so it can be planted out at almost any time.  Your cutting is developing its roots.  So it needs a bit more time.  I would probably wait until autumn.

Not wishing to sadden you, but. Roses from cuttings do not live as long as grafted/budded ones.  Having said that.  It will more than likely be around for several decades.

Once again.  Well done.  Now go and do some more.

 

Regards.

Mike.

04/06/2014 at 23:30

Thanks so much for your replies. That's been so helpful and reassuring. Really appreciate it. I don't know the name of the rose unfortunately. 

Kris

05/06/2014 at 09:04

...just a couple of things I've noticed there...your plant could do with a cane inserted, such as the one you have in the pot to the left... inserting it into the top left hand corner shouldn't do much damage to the root system...and it will be needed to keep the stems straight before it's planted... I also notice that there isn't much compost in that container..several inches below the rim...it could do with a top up...in fact looking at the top growth it's probably almost ready to be planted out...those roots should be growing well in there... definitely needs to be outside...as nutcutlet said earlier..

..perhaps you'll post a photo when it's in flower, so we can see what it's like..

05/06/2014 at 21:46

ok thanks very much. One more question if that's ok...when winter comes (it will be in the ground of course) do I prune it back as with other roses, or do I leave it alone given that it is it's first year?

I will top-up the compost and put it outside in its pot for now. Guess I need to decide whether to cut those two top stems or not!!!

thanks again.

Kris

05/06/2014 at 21:57

...up to you what you do there of course.... I don't fuss over these things and prefer to give plants their heads for the first year or two.... I can always catch up with pruning at a later time when I see how the plant develops... so for  me, no I wouldn't cut anything off until well into next year when I see more of what I've got...at least you won't have to worry about suckers....

05/06/2014 at 22:09
Salino wrote (see)

...up to you what you do there of course.... I don't fuss over these things and prefer to give plants their heads for the first year or two.... I can always catch up with pruning at a later time when I see how the plant develops... so for  me, no I wouldn't cut anything off until well into next year when I see more of what I've got...at least you won't have to worry about suckers....

 

Thanks very much. If I don't prune at all, as in not even the two present climbing shoots, will it still develop a strong base with new growth - as Mike said. Obviously I want it to have strong growth as it's on it's own roots and is only pencil width!

05/06/2014 at 22:53

..to be honest, I think you're fortunate to have 2 nice stems growing up already for such a young plant... it's difficult to say what will happen as I don't know the name of the rose you have..but own root roses can grow attractively from the base, throwing up their stems in their own time, without that ugly graft union...

...it won't hurt it if you cut them back, you're not going to kill it...but realise that some roses can sulk if they are stopped in their tracks in such a manner at this time of year, and not put on any fresh growth for some time....  this is why I like to give them their heads...that's my way of doing things...others will tell you different....up to you really...can't decide for you as to prune back those fine stems now would not be my way of gardening...  but it's not a great issue....climbing roses are usually tough and thrifty whatever we do with them...tolerating neglect and all sorts of rough treatment....

 

06/06/2014 at 20:01

Thanks that's really helpful. I think I will let them grow then! I don't know the name of the mother rose but here is a picture just for information.

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/48407.jpg?width=512&height=350&mode=max

 

 

07/06/2014 at 00:23

 ...just past it's best by the looks of it, but probably a great sight when in full bloom I imagine...  might be one of the Austin's...they usually are these days..

...here's a photo of a little rose of mine, - flowerless at the moment -  that I grew from a cutting, so it's on it's own roots although it looks grafted, but it isn't... it's because it was in the ground and grew a nice shape with lots of stems from the base... nothing to do with my pruning techniques...just left to it's own devices....   but it got attacked by aphids early this year, so I lifted and repotted it...had to cut it back as all flower buds totally destroyed .. it was early in the season and caught me out.....anyway it's sulked ever since...8 weeks..... and I can just now see tiny signs of regrowth...

...it's a charming little rose when in full bloom, and has much history attached... it's such fun growing roses from cuttings I think... don't you..? when it flowers again I shall take another photo.... I hope to see more of yours too, see how it gets on, in the fullness of time...

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/48424.jpg?width=273&height=350&mode=max

 

07/06/2014 at 08:51
Salino wrote (see)

 ...just past it's best by the looks of it, but probably a great sight when in full bloom I imagine...  might be one of the Austin's...they usually are these days..

...here's a photo of a little rose of mine, - flowerless at the moment -  that I grew from a cutting, so it's on it's own roots although it looks grafted, but it isn't... it's because it was in the ground and grew a nice shape with lots of stems from the base... nothing to do with my pruning techniques...just left to it's own devices....   but it got attacked by aphids early this year, so I lifted and repotted it...had to cut it back as all flower buds totally destroyed .. it was early in the season and caught me out.....anyway it's sulked ever since...8 weeks..... and I can just now see tiny signs of regrowth...

...it's a charming little rose when in full bloom, and has much history attached... it's such fun growing roses from cuttings I think... don't you..? when it flowers again I shall take another photo.... I hope to see more of yours too, see how it gets on, in the fullness of time...

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/48424.jpg?width=350

 

Wow! That really is amazing! I hope mine does as well I didn't know you could take roses out of the ground and repot them. I thought their roots may be too extensive. I don't know much about roses though! Yes I love propagation but never managed with roses. They always dry out or they rot no matter what I do. So this time I thought I'd try rooting them in water and it worked! How old is yours now? It looks wonderful. If I let mine flower so early it wont hurt it right? The buds are really small.

07/06/2014 at 11:18

..thank you.... it hadn't been in the ground all that long...but didn't even drop its leaves...it may drop some when new growth arrives... I first took the cutting about 3 years ago I think...from a container grown plant in Kent...the cutting was about 8 inches long...I transported it wrapped in damp tissue, during the summer...to my garden in North Cambridgeshire...several hours drive... put in the ground and it rooted by following Spring... amazing really...

..it's also a rose with a great history if somewhat obscure... it is known variously as Rosa x odorata 'Sanguinea'...Rosa 'Bengal Crimson' or 'Bengal Beauty'...and also rosa Indica Bengal Beauty... or Rosa chinensis 'Sanguinea'... amongst many others!...lol...

...it probably dates prior to 1818 and came to England from China via Bengal... no one knows its Chinese name...but it's thought to be very close to Rosa chinensis and of course it's this rose's genes that gives modern roses today their repeat flowering abilities... China roses are also unique in that the flowers change colour.... Bengal Crimson does the same... in cold weather they are dark pink...in warm weather they are dark red...

..I grew this rose on the south coast where I had it in full leaf and masses of flowers in mid-January, -5 deg c. covered with snow and frost...yet it didn't bat an eyelid and when thawed it just carried on the same...  if it is mild in December, it will continue to produce flower buds...although I think it's at its best in May/June..when the flowers are dark red...

...at the Chelsea Physic garden in London they have a big bush of it, like a climber...I know this one I have remains short...and it's possible mine is a short growing sport called 'Miss Lowe'....   they need rich soil and careful cultivation...and perhaps they are not the roses for modern gardeners, unless you have a specific interest in historic types like these....consequently you would rarely find this in a garden centre...although saying that..I bought the original plant at RHS Wisley where they also grow it in their garden...

...so you see...a  rose with such connections....I  just cannot get rid of it...and must make sure I give it its best next time it goes in the ground...

...back to yours...and if you ask me, which you have, then I am bound to tell you to allow your own root rose to do its own thing for a while...I don't like to 'check' them in any way at this stage...so if it wants to flower...let it flower.... any remedial work can be done much later when it's grown on a bit....

07/06/2014 at 11:52

..sorry to draw this out...but I should add that, regarding your rose, having spent so much time and patience...I don't like to miss out on the flowers - it gives one such satisfaction when grown from a cutting... and of course this presents us with the opportunity to prune back after flowering..as the flowers won't last long..thereby satisfying all requirements here... then wait and see how it shoots out after that...

07/06/2014 at 15:24

Now that's some history! wow impressive. I can imagine how satisfying it must be to be have been able to propagate. I guess one can never really tell how they react to the weather either. Some just surprise us! Thanks for all the advice. I will keep you posted on how it does and hopefully will have two flowers soon...which I'm sure will be quite small in size! Satisfying just the same though! Hopefully they will smell as nice as the mother plant too! 

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