Start a new thread

1 to 20 of 20 replies

I'm ashamed to confess that despite living in Edinburgh for 4 years and now living only an hour's drive away, I have never been to Edinburgh Botanic Gardens. I have however been to two of it's sister gardens - Benmore and Dawyck - definitely recommended both. Edinburgh is on my 'must see' list and maybe over the next few months we will get around to it. I used to live directly across the road from Glasgow Botanic Gardens in a wee bedsit, but that was long before I was bitten by the gardening bug, and tho I did walk through it on the odd occasion I didn't really appreciate it as I would appreciate it now.
In my youth I made lots of trips to Birmingham Botanic Gardens - via school biology/geography and family trips. It's a great place, futher enlivened at the time by a cockatoo which swore like a trooper.
I always start the year planning to visit lots of gardens but work and wanting to be in my own garden tend to get in the way. I even missed the Edinburgh Botanic gardens when we visited Edinburgh a couple of years ago. Maybe this year I will do better
Even better than visiting Botanic Gardens is to be a volunteer gardener in one. I have been such in the Bristol Botanic garden for some years now and it gives me inspiration, help with tricky problems, and free seeds and plants as well as making lots of very good friends with other gardening enthusiasts. Some very exotic plants I look upon as "mine" now as i have cared for them over the years.
Forget going to Edinburgh BG the one in Glasgow is much better and free to get into! Have a look at The Glasgow Botanic Garden web pages: http://www.glasgow.gov.uk/en/Residents/Parks_Outdoors/Parks_gardens/botanicgardens.htm

Advertisement

Akela Anne - cut your leggy plant down to just above the crown and re-pot. You can root any small off-shoots in small pots. You would be well advised to look up the potting medium as it has to be a well-aerated one.
Aponogeton - why can't I visit both Glasgow and Edinburgh and then decide for myself which one I prefer?
mY FAMILY AND i VISITED CIMBRIDGE BOTANIC GARDENS ONE SUNDAY IN LATE WINTER THIS YEAR. IT WAS WONDERFUL AND EVEN MY 3 ADOLESCENTS (WHO THINK I'M A PLANT NERD) ENJOYED IT. THE FRAGRANCES OF THE WINTER FLOWERING SHRUBS WERE UNBELIEVABLE AND I GOT LOTS OF IDEAS FROM THE WINTER GARDEN.
In the words of the poet laureate when I was a child - "Go down to Kew in lilac-time, in lilac-time,in lilac-time. Go down to Kew in lilac-time. It isn't far from London." Our greatest botanic garden is now a world heritage site and the lilacs are showing great promise this year.
I have grown some beautiful tulips this year, but they are unusual and have five heads on one stalk. Has any one else ever some across this?
I have a orchid and the leaf is going yellow with black spots it is four years old is this normal, if so can you help Tanking you in advance rosemarydixiglue@yahoo.com
I have a orchid and the leaf is going yellow with black spots it is four years old is this normal, if so can you help Tanking you in advance rosemarydixiblue@yahoo.com
I have a small child safe water feature but the pump did not survive winter. I was considering puchasing a small solar panel pump, does any one have any knowledge of the pumps, are they any good, will they work in our English climate? or should I just stick to a plug in pump?
Seaside Claire: Solar pumps are only really any good with very small water features; what the gain in environmental purity they lack in poke! Venetia: Orchids are not really my area of expertise, I'm afraid, but black spots on a yellowing leaf does not sound terribly healthy. If you are a member of the RHS they have an excellent diagnostic service (http://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/index.asp)

Advertisement

I used to love Kew Gardens when I was a little girl, and took my children when they were children, but I live nearer to Wakehurst so am a regular visitor there instead, also visit Wisley at times,how ever our Horticultral group visit Kew & Wisley yearly and I take the oppotunaty to take in these outings when I can.
The other evening I was searching through the stations on tv, when I spotted a documentary on BBC4, titled: ‘How Britain Got the Gardening Bug’. I thought this would be great to watch. They approached the subject from gardening in the days of World War 2, right up to the present. Percy Thrower was there as was Geoff Hamilton, but there was a glaring omission from their array of celebrated gardeners. As Germaine Greer warbled on about the philosophy of the whole thing, I began to wonder, have they forgotten Geoffrey Smith, one of the finest gardeners of the early 1980’s. As far as I could see, poor Geoffrey Smith, was omitted from the programme. Well I liked Geoffrey Smith even if some cannot remember his name. How Britain Got the Gardening Bug, BBC4, 29th March 21:00. Please repeat some of his programmes for us who really enjoyed their whole charm. http://jonathanasmyth.blogspot.com/
could anyone tell me why my spurge which is now hugh doesnt flower.its now been in a border for two years but did flower the first year when it was in a pot
I planted a Jacaranda seed bought back from Madeira about 6 years ago, the tree is now 8ft tall and unable to go into the concervatory how can I keep this presious plant this winter.
I know that feeling all too well! I very rarely get to visit "proper" gardens. Well, unless you count visiting the Eden project for the summer gigs. Creepy Cycads? I always thought they were wonderful! Ryan

Sign up or log in to post a reply