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24/03/2013 at 12:08

This will be a good thread for everybody more so me who has just taking up gardening last Sept well done Brumbull i will follow this thread with great interest.

24/03/2013 at 12:10

Not sure if it's a practical tip or not - but coming from a farming family, I was always told that it was tradition for a farmer to judge whether the soil was warm enough to sow seed, by pulling down his breeches and sitting his bare b*m on the soil - if it felt warm then he could sow his corn.

Don't think I'll be sowing anything outside just yet 

24/03/2013 at 12:16

Great idea for a thread. One of the things we are always told in books/TV is "right plant right place". However I would like to add to this that "plants cant read" [ not original quote ]. What I mean is that it is often worth trying plants in places that they shouldnt do well in and you may be very pleasantly surprised. I would not of course suggest putting a vey expensively purchased sun lover into deep shade, but if you grow a lot from seeds or cuttings it is worth trying. I grow lupins very happily in a bog which shouldnt work...... Of course you could say why not just grow bog plants there? Well I do bur I really like the combinations they make with the lupins.

24/03/2013 at 14:48

Don't think too many will need to pull down the breeches and sit down to realise it is not warm enough yet!!!

24/03/2013 at 15:44

I'm another that uses pieces of pegged down pea netting across prepared soil, just as TJ suggests.

I also do the same with pots of bulbs in the Autumn, thus foiling the blackbirds, who root about in the compost thus displacing small bulbs & squirrels who dig about in any uncovered pot!

My tip- when pricking out seedlings into bigger modules/pots, add a small cut off piece of coloured drinking straw as a 'label' for each seedling. Then add the same colour straw to a pot that actually has a label. That way you only use one label, but you can tell which tray of seedlings are which, simply by looking at the colour of the straw! So no surprises at flowering time. It is also saving money, ie fewer labels needed & the effort of recleaning them at the end of a season.  J.

24/03/2013 at 16:02
fish4card wrote (see)

dovefromabove"

 I was always told that it was tradition for a farmer to judge whether the soil was warm enough to sow seed, by pulling down his breeches and sitting his bare b*m on the soil - if it felt warm then he could sow his corn."

sounds like an old wives tale to me

If you don'tt want to do the above use your elbow , this morning there was a link to you tube

where a man sprayed deep heat onto dried t-bags and buried these just below the surface of the

soil ,it seems Cats can't stand the smell of it ,tried it . seems to work

Derek

24/03/2013 at 16:10

Soak seeds in Orange juice or Coke for 24-48 hrs. The acidity helps break down seed coats without scarification.

24/03/2013 at 16:11

See also this video with a great method to keep cats away from freshly turned/added soil:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WW2tZUG8cpQ

24/03/2013 at 16:12

The above video shows the method mentioned by clogherhead

24/03/2013 at 16:14

Swiss Sue ,Thanks

Derek

24/03/2013 at 16:24

From the same gardener some good tips on how to discourage slugs. Right at the end is one which would suit Flo and Busy-Lizzy who both own horses!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9LNLE7ff2eI

 

Lyn
24/03/2013 at 23:38
I noticed that in the GW mag they were planting gladioli, my tip would be to put a nice handful of sand in the bed first and bed the Corms down in that, slugs hate it.
Ps. No need to thank me Brum, it's only a tip.;)
25/03/2013 at 17:49

Mine would be to get a pair of knee pads! Not the most glamorous objects, but just strap 'em on and you can forget about 'em.*

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/20515.jpg?width=160&height=160&mode=max

 So much easier than lugging round a kneeling mat.

* In fact, I've often wandered off downtown with them on...

25/03/2013 at 18:48

Like your idea of wearing knee pads Figrat

25/03/2013 at 19:19

when I used to be employed , gee that sounds nice, I wore a 2 piece overall the knee's had pockets for knee-pads ,the type above might get uncofortable over time as the straps dig into the back of the  knee

Derek

25/03/2013 at 19:39
figrat wrote (see)

Mine would be to get a pair of knee pads! Not the most glamorous objects, but just strap 'em on and you can forget about 'em.*

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/20515.jpg?width=350

 So much easier than lugging round a kneeling mat.

* In fact, I've often wandered off downtown with them on...

They'll all be wearing 'em next year in Paris....  My tip for what it's worth - don't slavishly follow guidelines on height and spread of plants . Your own conditions/micro climate/soil etc  can make a huge difference.

25/03/2013 at 19:51
@derek - been using them for 5 years now, never had that problem. Velcro fastening, so easy to put on and take off too.
25/03/2013 at 20:38

Don't sow your seeds twirly

Pam LL x

25/03/2013 at 20:51

Here's a good one. If you have a sickly plant you can help it recover with an asprin. I've used this method and it really does work.

Here' s a link for the science geeks.http://www.ehow.co.uk/info_8618193_aspirin-spray-plants.html

Also, A dose of epsom salts for leaf colouration for pelargoniums - it's magnesium sulphate. One tablespoon in 1 litre of water.

Love the knee pads , Figrat.  Brilliant idea !

 

Lyn
26/03/2013 at 13:46

My tip: We have all tried eggs shells as a slug deterrent, save the shells and pop them in the oven, just on the shelf, next time you bake, they come out even more spiteful and crunchy and a lot less messy to scrunch up.

I use the knee pads, keeps your knees dry as well as comfortable.

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