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7 messages
14/06/2013 at 17:42

I have a lot of what I think is aubretia (masses of lilac tiny ground cover flowers, we inherited it when we moved in so not certain of its name)

I have always just left it be, but this year it has gone mad and I will have to tidy it up.

My question is, can you/should you give the aubretia a haircut after flowering???

Also can you start cuttings from it, or do you have to buy new seed??

14/06/2013 at 17:56

Yes good haircut after flowering removing all flowers. For those cascading a fair distance I trim all over but maintaining the general length.  You can cut back as hard as you like but no need to be too drastic.  Aubretia looks sorry for itself after being cut back but it is only for a short while until growth resumes.

Best from seed if you want lots of plants or buy a variety you like....there are reds, blues, even variegated varieties.  Some with large flowers others with small

14/06/2013 at 22:19

Thanks for that Verdun, 

In the past the aubretia looks very bedraggled and exhausted after flowering, so a trim cannot look any worse I dont think.

I have noticed the many colours that are available and are bright and vibrant.

 I think I'll have a portion.

15/06/2013 at 08:29

mine are looking awful at the moment as the snails have enjoyed munching it?, does it self seed readily? parts of mine have small seed pods on I wondered whether I should cut them back or just leave them?

15/06/2013 at 10:15

Mmmm !! interesting point.

15/06/2013 at 10:34

I would say they do benefit from a good hair cut after flowering. I'm going to leave some seed heads on some to see if they self seed. I think if they like where they are they should self seed. Not much success at growing from seed, but I think it's possible to take cuttings, not tried it myself though

08/06/2014 at 10:56

I think they can spread by layering themselves. If you look closely you can see what looks like a lot of small roots coming out of the stems. Try pegging them into the soil and covering them with earth.  Then protect then from the B slugs and snails, as they tend to prune to death.

 

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