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How to grow fatsia japonica

How to grow Fatsia japonica

All you need to know about growing Japanese aralia, Fatsia japonica, in this detailed Grow Guide.

A table displaying which months are best to sow, plant and harvest.
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Plant
Plant

Do not Plant in January

Do not Plant in February

Do not Plant in March

Do Plant in April

Do Plant in May

Do Plant in June

Do not Plant in July

Do not Plant in August

Do not Plant in September

Do not Plant in October

Do not Plant in November

Do not Plant in December

Flowers
Flowers

Plant does not flower in January

Plant does not flower in February

Plant does not flower in March

Plant does not flower in April

Plant does not flower in May

Plant does not flower in June

Plant does not flower in July

Plant does not flower in August

Plant does flower in September

Plant does flower in October

Plant does not flower in November

Plant does not flower in December

Fruits
Fruits

Plant does not fruit in January

Plant does not fruit in February

Plant does not fruit in March

Plant does not fruit in April

Plant does not fruit in May

Plant does not fruit in June

Plant does not fruit in July

Plant does not fruit in August

Plant does not fruit in September

Plant does not fruit in October

Plant does fruit in November

Plant does fruit in December

Japanese aralia or paper plant, Fatsia japonica, is a fantastic foliage plant, native to Japan. A medium sized shrub, Fatsia japonica bears glossy evergreen leaves and spherical, ivy-like flowers, followed by black berries. It’s a great choice for a shady spot in the garden, and it can also be grown as a house plant.

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Fatsia japonica is guaranteed to add an exotic touch to the garden, especially in winter. It looks good teamed with softer grasses and bamboos, but also works in contrast with smaller leafed shrubs, or bold plants such as canna lilies.

How to grow Fatsia japonica

Fatsia japonica is versatile and can be grown in a variety of locations, from shady garden spots to hot sunny patios. It also works well as a house plant, preferably in a cool, well-ventilated room with no central heating (a conservatory is ideal). Plant in spring into moist but well-drained, fertile soil, with added well-rotted compost or manure. Keep well watered initially while the plant settles in, and then water in dry conditions only. Propagate from semi-ripe cuttings in late summer.

More on growing Fatsia japonica:


Where to grow Fatsia japonica

How to grow Fatsia japonica - where to grow Fatsia japonica
How to grow Fatsia japonica – where to grow Fatsia japonica

Fatsia japonica is versatile and can be grown in a variety of locations. It’s a good choice for a tricky shady spot, but is just as suited to a hot, sunny, location such as a patio or urban courtyard. Salt and wind tolerant, Fatsia japonica is also suitable for coastal gardens.

As a house plant, Fatsia japonica is best grown in a cool, airy room. For best results, ensure the room remains cool in winter and is not centrally heated – move it for winter, if necessary. An unheated conservatory makes the perfect setting for an indoor fatsia.

Bear in mind that Fatsia japonica is quite slow-growing, so choose a large specimen if you want to fill a space quickly.


How to plant Fatsia japonica

Plant Fatsia japonica in spring so it can establish over the warmer months. Dig a generous hole, adding a couple of handfuls of well-rotted compost or manure and a sprinkling of mycorrhizal funghi to help the plant settle in. Plant at the same depth it was in the pot, replace soil around the root ball and firm in gently. Water well, and continue to water for the next couple of weeks, after which you should only need to water in dry periods.


How to grow and care for Fatsia japonica

How to grow Fatsia japonica - where to care for Fatsia japonica
How to grow Fatsia japonica – where to care for Fatsia japonica

Fatsias need little care over the growing year. Remove dead and dying leaves of indoor-grown fatsias as and when you need to, and prune lightly in mid- to late-spring, to maintain a pleasing shape.

Light pruning also benefits outdoor-grown fatsias. Then, in autumn, apply a thick mulch around the base of the plant, which should protect the roots from cold conditions. Severe frost can damage fatsia leaves, and may therefore need protection. When prolonged bouts of frost are forecast, cover your fatsia with protective fleece.


How to propagate Fatsia japonica

Propagate Fatsia japonica by taking semi-ripe cuttings in late summer.


Growing Fatsia japonica: problem solving

Fatsias are generally pretty tough, but can be prone to attack from scale insects, thrips and mealybugs (indoor-grown plants are particularly susceptible). Also, keep a look out for leaf spot and remove affected leaves.

Yellowing fatsia leaves can suggest problems with your soil, but not always. Emma Crawforth, BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine, explains how to deal with yellowing fatsia leaves, in our Quick Tips video:


Advice on buying fatsias

  • Whether you’re buying a fatsia as a house plant or garden shrub, make sure you have the right growing conditions before you buy
  • Buy only the healthiest plants – check the plant over for signs of pests and damage before planting

Where to buy fatsias online

Fatsia japonicas to grow

How to grow Fatsia japonica - Fatsia japonica 'Spider's Web'
How to grow Fatsia japonica – Fatsia japonica ‘Spider’s Web’
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  • Fatsia japonica ‘Variegata’ – a slightly less hardy and less common variegated form of Fatsia japonica, with leaves edged in cream. Usually sold as an indoor plant
  • Fatsia x Fatshedera lizei – is an intergeneric hybrid that combines the large, glossy palmate foliage and unusual flowers of Fatsia japonica with the climbing habit of ivy, hence it’s known as tree ivy
  • Fatsia japonica ‘Spider’s Web’ – slightly slower growing than the species, ‘Spider’s Web’ has variegated, speckled leaves giving them a webbed appearance