Saxifraga fortunei

Plants for green roofs with soil depth 100mm

Take a look at our top pick of plants for green roofs with a soil depth of around 100mm or 10cm.

Turn the top of your garden structure into a home for plants and a welcome haven for wildlife.

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As wildlife habitats decline, green roofs can help to redress the ecological balance – a tiny step, but in the right direction.

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See below for our pick of plants for your green roof with a soil depth of 100mm.


Thrift

Armeria maritima
Armeria maritima

Armeria maritima is at home on cliff ledges and rocky outcrops. This plant is a born survivor, and keeps its tufty leaves all winter. There are cultivars with deeper pink flowers, but the species is the prettiest.


Poppies

Papaver nudicaule
Papaver nudicaule

The little Japanese poppy, Papaver nudicaule, is easy to grow – sow it direct or in modules. It’s a short-lived perennial and will self-seed. Alternatively, try the pictured orange California poppies (Eschscholzia californica). Flowers May to June.


Auriculas

Primula auricula
Primula auricula

Tougher than it looks, Primula auricula is a mountain dweller. It has leathery leaves to withstand rough weather and extremes of heat and cold, and deeper roots than many of its relatives. Flowers from March to May.


Rhodohypoxis baurii

Rhodohypoxis baurii
Rhodohypoxis baurii

Although it needs dry winters, rhodohypoxis is a delightful South African bulb that should be happy in the well-drained conditions of a roof. It spreads by underground stolons to form large, vibrant clumps. Flowers June to July.


Saxifrage

Saxifraga 'Winifred Bevington'
Saxifraga ‘Winifred Bevington’
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Saxifraga ‘White Pixie’ is an evergreen alpine plant that produces pretty sprays of white flowers. It’s best planted in sun or semi-shade. Flowers May to June. You could also grow ‘Variegata’ or ‘Freckles’.


Kate Bradbury says

If your shed has a pitched roof, then it’s likely one side will get more sun than the other. Choose shade-tolerant plants for the shadier side, or install a mirror to reflect sunlight onto the roof, enabling more sun-loving plants to grow.

Kate Bradbury