Autumn bedding pot display

Autumn bedding pot display

Find out how to make a classy pot display, in shades of white, purple and silver.

A table displaying which months are best to sow, plant and harvest.
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
At its best
At its best

Plant is not at its best in January

Plant is not at its best in February

Plant is not at its best in March

Plant is not at its best in April

Plant is not at its best in May

Plant is not at its best in June

Plant is not at its best in July

Plant is not at its best in August

Plant is at its best in September

Plant is at its best in October

Plant is at its best in November

Plant is not at its best in December

To do
To do

Do not To do in January

Do not To do in February

Do not To do in March

Do not To do in April

Do not To do in May

Do not To do in June

Do not To do in July

Do not To do in August

Do not To do in September

Do To do in October

Do not To do in November

Do not To do in December

When summer pots run out of steam, it’s a good idea to replace your displays with plants that will look good in autumn and beyond.

We’ve given traditional autumn bedding plants a modern twist by combining them with evergreens and keeping to a limited colour palette.

Purple, white and silver make a classy trio, and bring instant glamour to any terrace or balcony. We’ve used five types of plant – ornamental cabbage, brachyglottis, heuchera, cineraria and cyclamen. All should be available at the garden centre at this time of year – feel free to mix up varieties according to what you can find.

Remember to deadhead cyclamen regularly to keep the flowers coming. Once the container is past its best, the brachyglottis and heuchera can be planted out in your garden.

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You Will Need

  • Brachyglottis 'Sunshine'
  • Heuchera 'Obsidian'
  • Cineraria
  • Purple ornamental cabbages (2)
  • White mini-cyclamen (2)
  • 30cm terracotta pot
  • Multi-purpose, peat-free compost

Total time:

Step 1

Fill the pot two-thirds full, using good quality, peat-free multi-purpose compost.

Adding compost to the pot
Adding compost to the pot

Step 2

Position the tallest plants first, teasing out the roots as you go. As a general rule, the taller the plant, the further towards the back of your container it should go.

Planting up the pot
Planting up the pot

Step 3

Add the remaining shorter plants to the front and sides, then fill in the gaps with more compost, firming down well with your hands.

Planting up the pot
Planting up the pot

Step 4

Water the container well and move it to its final position. It’s important not to let the compost dry out.

Watering the pot
Watering the pot
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Kevin Smith says…

The brachyglottis and heuchera can be moved to the garden when the display is past its best. This will give them a life beyond the container, meaning you’re getting real value for money from your plants.

Kvein Smith